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THE UNFINISHED WORK OF PAINT BY NUMBER, 1960-2001
POSTED COMMENTS/"POST A REMINISCENCE"
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Public Opinion Public-opinion "mobile" from a Palmer Paint Company scrapbook. PBN/NMAH.


Post a Reminiscence

We would enjoy reading and possibly posting your reminiscences about paint by number. Send a message to pbn@nmah.si.edu.

Please let us know how and if you wish to be identified in your message.

Thanks in advance for your kind consideration and interest in the exhibitions, publications, and programs of the Smithsonian Institution.

We welcome any comment you may care to make.


Since this siteís debut in April 2001, we have asked people to share via e-mail their memories of paint by number. The earliest are at the top, the most recent at the bottom. Several have been edited to reduce length.

Larry Bird

Curator


April 2001
May 2001
June 2001
July/August 2001
September/October 2001
November 2001 - February 2002
March 2002 - May 2002
June 2002 - December 2002
January 2003-September 2004
November 2004-December 2005


Great idea for exhibit!

My Russian Jewish grandparents both did paint by number for a hobby. They had immigrated to America from Ukraine, during the early 1920's, via Ellis Island. My grandfather eventually became a successful grocery store/butcher shop owner/proprietor in Princeton, NJ. He was a man who loved to learn, and reading the Torah/Bible was his favorite pastime. My grandmother loved all things artistic. Much to my surprise, one summer when we went to visit them in Trenton NJ, I was astonished to see, set up in the kitchen, and on the back porch, some paint by number canvases on easels, partially completed, the oil waiting to dry. My Nanny told me she and Poppy had taken it up for "Ďobbies" (no H pronounced), for their health. The stink of the oil made me question their choice of "healthy" hobbies!! The shock to a small kid to realize his grandparents "played" with paints was truly a novelty!

Thank you!

Grandaughter of two wonderful Russian immigrants
April 6, 2001

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Yes, I painted by the numbers in my late teens, and framed them inexpensively, and hung them on the walls of my family's home. We were relatively poor and this was a fun activity we could afford. I remember having a wooden hand rest that fit across the picture so you could continue painting before one color got dry.

We lived in a small town in the mountains of Pennsylvania with no access to "art." No museums were close by, no school teachers were proficient in art subjects, no one that I recall brought art to our community.

Today, the schools teach all manner of art disciplines; there are many, many more museums; teachers take the children to the museums; magazines such as the Smithsonian include articles about art. Note cards feature famous art; organizations such as the Alzheimerís Association use famous artists on their "free" cards. There are art shows/fairs all over the country. The climate for art is entirely different from what it was in small town 1950s.

I donít know that it was paint by numbers that fostered my interest, but I now visit all the museums I can find, both near my home and on my numerous trips throughout the world, to see "art." I have no talent for painting or sculpture; but I like to take photographs of scenery and many people like my compositions. Several of my photographs have won prizes in a local art show. Who knows, maybe it was "paint-by-numbers" that helped me learn composition.

Iím happy to see the renewed interest in this genre. I think it formed the basis for other crafts, such as the "stained glass" kits Iíve seen. Iím very hopeful of getting to Washington to see this exhibit before it closes.

Carol W. Elliott
Flagler Beach, FL
April 7, 2001

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I was in grammar school in the early Ď60's, and every year for Christmas, whoever drew my name, would get me a paint by number set. I hated it. I wanted to get bath powder and bubble bath, or "Evening in Paris" perfume sets, or manicure sets, something "girlie," anything but paint by number.

But, as an amateur artist today, I am thoroughly surprised to see how my work has been influenced by the very thing I wanted least. The way I handle color and form reminds me so much of the sets. Paint by number introduced me to the smell and feel of "real" oil paint that still thrills me today. Thank you. I wish I still had some of my old paint by numbers to hang on the wall now.

Judy Newell Murdock
Boaz, AL
April 10, 2001

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I would love to see this exhibit!

I was a child of the 50s and loved art. My parents would give me paint by number sets, along with "real" art supplies. The great thing about paint-by-number was that it gave me a chance to "feel" paint, plan how to work with wet paint, clean up afterwards (!), take care of the brushes, be patient when the paint has to dry.... Even the oddly-shapes numbered spaces taught contours, modeling, and how our eyes blend colors to form shapes and shadows. I quickly became frustrated with constraints of paint-by-number, but being a good little catholic girl in the fifties, did not even consider painting outside the lines! Until my mother asked about a strange blotch of color on one completed painting. I explained that was the color that "they" said I had to use. And she explained I could have made it ANY color I wanted! I didnít have to do it that way just because "they" said so! What a revelation for a 9-year-old kid in the 50s! I would take the "leftover" paint from the PBN kits and try my hand at my original compositions!

Fast forward Ė I have a degree in art and have worked as an art director in television and advertising, a photographer, a designer, and an art teacher on the college level. Not bad for a paint-by-numbers start!

Thanks for listening!

Kathryn L. Bergstrom
April 10, 2001

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This feels like a confessional. I have a masters degree in art, I am a director of a non profit art space, I have been an art professional for almost thirty years! And yes- I have a small collection(14-15) paint by numbers in my basement, hanging on a wall all together, some are gifts from friends who know about my shameful passion. I also cruise St. Vincents, and Goodwill and garage and rummage sales for the perfect paint by number examples. I love them. I did a paint by number kit I got for Christmas when I was eight years old. It was a pair of ballerinas, which I botched by the time I got to their ankles. There I was, a little farm kid, in January, at the dining room table with my kit, my cousin, who lived a half mile away, got a pair of palomino horse heads. They turned out great, and hung in the entry of their farm house for years. My collection includes duplicates of scenes of the old church in the snow and woods, The Last Supper, a Head of Christ, Hunting Dogs, Mallards, Wood and Waterfalls, Barns and what I call Vermont scenes, Deer Leaping About, and I have an in-the original- box of sailboats and water scenes. Several of which are not even touched. The original paint containers are there too. I have been looking for the ballerinas I had as a kid, and horse heads, with no luck so far. This exhibit and the bibliography will help me in my quest.

Thank you for this opportunity.

Cheryl Parker
Sturgeon Bay, WI
April 11, 2001

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There was no greater joy as a child than to get a new paint by number kit. When I first started, It was as if all things were possible. My childhood dream of being an artist was titillated by paint by number kits, my favorite being the face of a dog with many shades of brown. Sometimes I gaged my capability by how many different numbers there were, or the size of the spaces. I can even remember the scent which emanated from the little white pots of paint as I opened and stirred them, which somehow fanned my artist dream even more. Stirring the oil which always separated from the paint, then cleaning my brush so I would not glob out the lines, were always great challenges! Sometimes when I am in the art and hobby shop getting supplies for school projects, I slip over to the shelf where the paint by number kits are, and my mind races back to all those scents, and the excitement returns. Then I hear my mother saying "Now what are you going to do with that thing?" and my hand drops back down and I saunter over to another counter. I give up too easily now, and did then, which is probably why I became an editor instead of an artist.

Thanks for asking for remembrances!

Lennie Washington
April 11, 2001

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Two reasons I liked the paint-by-numbers masterpieces I created were these:

1) Many of the pictures I did came about through the free time I had when I was home from school sick. I canít recall faking a fever to finish my da Vinci, though.

2) And then another big selling point for me was that great smell of the paint. Finally, about TV supplanting PBN, I, personally, found great satisfaction painting over yet another segment while watching I Love Lucy. Which brings to mind the segmentation -- you didnít just get to complete one picture. Each color segment was its own work of art, small enough to be done in no time, but giving a sense of closure. THATís what it is about TV, too. And thatís how I was able to fly through Lonesome Dove many years later - small chapters. Which brings me to a bag of potato chips.

Arthur Davies
April 16, 2001

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Every Friday, when my mother went to local grocery store to do the weekly shopping, she would also stop at the "variety store" and bring back a paint-by-number kit for my sister and I to work on while we watched TV on Friday night. We were partial to animals (puppies, kittens, horses, etc.)...but my mother liked Oriental scenes. My mother and I ended up working on them because my sister and I would always start fighting....she would use the "wrong" colors and go over the lines (artistic license) while I wanted it to look like a perfect replica of the picture on the box lid. We would have cheese and crackers while we did this....Ritz crackers with cheese that was sprayed on them from an aerosol can.....

Barbara Strand
April 18, 2001

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My family was an ill lot. It seems my Mother, her 2 Sisters, and the 2 Daughters of these, were always home ill on the couch. I remember, having been born in 1952, PAINT BY NUMBER was discovered here in Iowa about 1956 to 1958. From that moment on, our walls were covered wish scenes from Americana, homes, animals, etc. To me, they always had a "warm and fuzzy", later, a "Disney" feel to them.

And so, today, as I cruise the aisles of the resale shops, whenever I see the same finished pictures languishing in the bins under layers of dust, I harken back immediately to the smells of oil paint, thinner, medicines, and high fevers.

April 16, 2001

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I just visited your web site regarding the paint-by-number craze of the 1950s. Being a child in the era (I was born in 1948) I have many fond memories of many types of paint-by-number kits my mother used to paint and provided for my brothers and myself. They were such a great pastime, especially on those cold wintery days in Minnesota or on one of those rainy stormy days in the summer when we couldnít play outside. We did a number of the Craft Master series and my mother lovingly framed them and hung them around our home. We couldnít afford "real" art, so to us it was a bit of luxury to have "real" oil paintings around the house. My mother painted them very precisely and she taught us to do the same. Granted it was sort of a family therapy sitting around the kitchen table painting for hours. I also remember the Venus Pencil paint-by-number kits which were around in the late 1950s and were even more exciting to do because they were done in rich-colored pencils, many kits having dozens of colors. I remember painting numerous pictures, such as the Taj Mahal, the South American jungle, market scenes in the Orient, tropical paradise palms and beaches, and other places I could only dream about visiting.

Thanks for rekindling some fond memories of my childhood. I only wish I had some of those "originals" now.

Loren Blakeslee
April 23, 2001

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I was pleased to browse through your Paint By Numbers display on your web site. It brought back a lot of memories. One or two on your site I remember doing, and a couple I would have loved to have done. Being from Muskegon, Michigan originally, I was surprised to learn they originated on the other side of the state in Detroit. It is fascinating. Thank you for taking the time to put it on the Internet for me.

Linda Gremillion
April 23, 2001

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My wife and I were just talking about the paint by number kits the other day. We both remember them being fun but we also remembered the problem with the paints. The paints were oil-based and needed time to dry before doing the next number. Well, house dust was magically attracted to the paint while it dried. You always ended up with a fuzzy number 5 or 2 color. By the time you finally finished, the entire picture was fuzzy. This is okay if you were painting puppies or kittens but seascapes.

All in all, through it was fun and a happy time and memory.

Tony and Dessina Crosby
Charlotte, NC
April 23, 2001

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I am now sitting in my living room looking at a paint by numbers of Emmett Kelley that my Mother did back in the early 70's. About 2 years before Mother died, my Dad made a beautiful frame for this picture and gave it to me for a Christmas present. At the time, I was not really impressed, but now I see the beauty of what I have. A picture painted by my dear departed

Mother and a frame made with my loving Dadís own hands. I would not take anything for this picture. I look at the picture and see Mother painting it and the memories are beautiful. We need more paint by numbers in my opinion.

Sincerely,

Sharla Coffee
Greenup, KY
April 24, 2001

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I was born and raised in a small town in Eastern Washington state, Colfax. Itís only claim to fame is that it is the county seat of Whitman County. I seem to recall having been given a paint by number kit by my Aunt Dorothy when I was 8 years old, which would have been around 1957. If I remember correctly it was the self-same house on the snowy hill featured on the opening page of the web site. I remember being amazed that the white board with the blue lines and numbers could actually turn into a painting of sorts. Fortunately for the world of art, I also discovered scale model airplanes at about the same time, so my hard earned allowance went to Revell and Monogram (I was above Lindbergh and Aurora kits, which I felt to be second rate) instead of Palmer. Aunt Dorothy felt she had to nurture the intellectual side of life, since my Dad was very much a product of the blue collar laboring class. I guess it worked in some form, since I went on to get a college degree and am now a library manager in South Carolina.

Thanks, Aunt Dorothy.

Robert E. Gants
Green Sea-Floyds Library
Green Sea, SC 29545
April 24, 2001

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I loved the paint by number paintings... I wish we could still buy them... I paint, but I remember back then the paintings made me feel a little like Grandma Moses.

Pamela Ferrell
April 24, 2001

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My father did a set of three paint-by-numbers pictures a long time ago. One of the set was a group of cocker spaniel puppies. The other two pictures were the mom and dad. I wish I knew what happened to them. As a child, I loved doing the Venus Paradise color by number kits. They were done with colored pencils. Thanks for a great site!

Deb Squicciarini
April 24, 2001

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I have always been intrigued by Paint by Numbers, dating way back to the early 60's when I received my first set and embarked on a lifelong "craft and art" lifestyle. As an adult, I started to collect fine examples of completed vintage 50's style Paint by Numbers about 3 years ago. All my friends thought I was crazy, just like they did when I started to collect Tramp Art Boxes five years ago. Your exhibit which I found out about in todayís Chicago Tribune lends me collecting credibility, and brings a smile to my face. Art is subjective and Paint by Numbers is totally an American Marketing Success Story. Thanks for acknowledgment.

Regards,

Beth Kamhi
April 25, 2001

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My sister and myself were subjected to this in Christmas, 1959 or Ď60. Being the oldest male sibling, I received "Blue Boy"; my sister being the oldest female, received "Pinky." Since I was already into interpreting life in the form of model trains, Iíd have much preferred more Balsa wood and Testorís paint/glue. (Model Railroading was in itís infancy still, and very crude by todayís standards.)

We both gave our paintings a try. Both gave it up.

To me, the whole experience was boring, especially compared to adventuring out on my bike, hiking, or in inclement weather playing with my trains. Maybe more sedentary people enjoyed them.

Now that Iím in that category, it might be fun to try it again, with the flexibility to override instructions that maturity brings.

Good Exhibit Idea!

D.
April 25, 2001

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I definitely remember the paint by number time. I did several myself, including a trio of pictures of hunting dogs. I canít remember what else I painted now, but the dogs hung in the living room for quite a while, as did some of the other "paintings" that I did. I know I enjoyed the time, and it kept me out of trouble several times since I was painting when I could have been somewhere else. Thanks for the memories, it brings back some good times, that I do miss sometimes now.

David Simmons
April 25, 2001

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Enjoyed your web site which was forwarded to me by a co-worker.

The imagery brings back fond memories of a paint-by-number piece one of my older brothers painted. It was a Venetian scene. When completed it had the feeling of a stained glass window looking out over the Venice canals.

I also remember the distinct smell of the paints and how intriguing they looked in their individual little pots with metal lids.

alta
April 26, 2001

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I still have my paint by number of a tigerís head in the jungle. People tease me about it, but it took a lot of time and focus and attention to detail. Many of those things are that - just a memory. Todayís life seems disjointed and subject to multi-tasking, without much sense of accomplishment or completion. I will always keep my "painting" as a fond reminder of that era of surplus time!

Patrick Beal
Dallas, TX
April 26, 2001

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I remember my mother purchasing paint by number paintings when I was about 5 years old. That would make it in the early 50's. My mother, my sister (1 year younger) and I would paint on rainy days when we could not go out to the playground. I remember that she would only allow one person at a time to paint, and she would always monitor what we did. The paintings many times took months. Strangely we all enjoyed it. She would always select beach, ocean or mountain vistas. She was patient and allowed us to make mistakes. She would paint over them when possible.

None of the paintings survived. I wish they had.

Jess Feldman
April 26, 2001

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Will the posts you receive be available for the public to read?

I am writing a book for grades 5-12 about the history of American recreation (Lerner Books, Minneapolis) and would love to see these responses to possibly use as quotes in my chapter about post-war recreation.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Christina Mierau
Tampa, FL
April 26, 2001

Feel free to quote from and cite the site for your history. LB

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Being a Baby Boomer I grew up with paint by numbers. I guess my family thought they were not good enough artists or had the confidence to go off on their own, so paint by numbers was a real treat and fun things to do in upstate New York. Long winters and days off from school lead to many hours of painting by numbers. When my Dad retired he returned to doing a few more paint by numbers but finding them were harder. Now I see them in antique shops/rummage sales and those pictures always bring a ting to my heart.

Somehow we all were artists in some way.

Yes you can share my thoughts.

Evy McGinness
Amelia Island, FL
April 26, 2001

p.s. My son is a NYC artist with shows in Paris/Munich and Tokyo despite never having done a paint by number.

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I was born in 1950, so I was a prime target for PBN. Just seeing the term "Paint by Numbers" brought back a flood of memories of my childhood. Many thanks for that. Among other things, it seems to me that it was a way to gain "acceptance" in my motherís eye (being the 3rd of six children). Completing one of the paintings as a gift for my mother made me feel important and accomplished.

Any way as I said thanks for the memories. I can smell the paints as I write this.

Tom Dobens
April 26, 2001

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I can remember my older brother probably in the late 1960s painting by number. He had talent and later painted at school and was the first boy to study Art at our High School (Australia 1970) How times change? He became an Architect and took up painting watercolor seascapes in recent years. It annoys me when the pseudo-intellectuals of the 50's belittled an innocent activity. Thatís my view.

Regards,
Robyn Pollock
April 27, 2001

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My name is Frank and I am a philistine when it comes to art appreciation. I do remember doing quite a few paint by numbers when I was a kid. I was born in 1950. I remember doing them with a great deal personal of satisfaction. I also think that doing them did increase my appreciation of art beyond where I was at the time. I could understand the effort and the work it took the guy who first painted it, along with some of his insights. It has certainly been one of my few ventures into the arts. Come to think of it, I wish I had one now to work on, can you get them anymore?

Take care, God Bless,

Rev. Francisco Conkle-RyŠn ST
LoŪza, Puerto Rico
April 27, 2001

Several companies are merchandising kits through hobby and craft stores, as well as on the web. LB

#

Thanks for some very interesting information. This hobby wasnít limited to canvas, but extended to metal goods as well. I have a metal trash can and a metal desk pen or letter holder, and know of another trash can in my area, all in remarkable shape in the context of their age.

Robert Ware
April 27, 2001

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I can smell the turpentine and oil paint now. My mother humored me in the mid-50's by allowing me to select a set of three paint by number barn landscapes from the Sears, Roebuck catalog. Two of my finished paintings were professionally framed and hung in our Nebraska farmhouse living room. Today, the differing colored contours and lines of demarcation shout, "paint by number!" but the memories are sweet, none-the-less. Mindless conformity? I thought my efforts were wonderful---I guess self-esteem came easier for teenagers fifty years ago!

Elaine Frasier
Max, NE
April 28, 2001

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I did a couple as a kid back in the late 50's but the only one I can remember is a Carmen Miranda type dancer wearing a billowing skirt in the village square. It hung in my bedroom for years, even after I move away. Then my Mom died and my Dad moved away so Iím sure it was thrown out in the trash. But I can still picture it in my mind, even where I gave her a big nose due to a paint blob.

Fred Schwartz
Raleigh, NC
April 28, 2001

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I guess I was about 13 when I received for Christmas from my Father a Paint-by-number kit. These are two 16 x 20 pictures. I spent hours doing them and when they were complete my father framed them. They are still hanging on the wall of my motherís living room.

These are two Oriental pictures. I havenít seen any like them since. I have recently decided that I want to start doing paint-by-number again. I am going to look on the Internet for some pictures to do. I saw the piece that was done on CBS Sunday Morning show today. I enjoyed it very much. It brought back good memories. I am 57 years old and my father passed away 20 years ago.

Sincerely,

Charlotte Stetson
Philadelphia, PA
April 29, 2001

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I have a 16 x 20 paint-by-number still life that I did in 1963 framed and hanging on my wall. I wonder where you got the paintings for the exhibit.

Pauline
April 29, 2001

Most of the kits and paintings in the show were kindly lent by collectors who scour flea markets, thrift stores, yard sales, and household goods auctions. LB

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Hanging on my wall are two 12"x16" tropical sunsets I painted for my mother-in-law for Christmas around 1963. I blended some of the colors in the sky and water. We stained the oak frames to walnut color. I won a blue ribbon on them at the county fair that year.

When my mother-in-law died, the pictures were returned to me. A quick wash-up with dish soap, and they look brand new.

You may use my name if you wish. Iím in southeast Kansas.

Judy Bay
April 29, 2001

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I painted many a picture back in the 50's and 60's. However in the 70's I realized that my kids were about to be College bound and I forced to start working two full time jobs to be able to send them to college. Then in 90's I retired and to my frustration couldnít find the paint by the numbers that I so greatly enjoyed. Someone told that they are not made anymore. Is that true or do I still have a chance to get them somewhere? I sincerely hope you can help me? I realize your not a help site, but I can always hope.

Thank you for reading this,

Robert
April 30, 2001

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My late father just LOVED to do Paint By Number! He did several pictures and a couple of tin trays that my mother still has. One of them was the Last Supper. He enjoyed doing these so much and was very meticulous with the painting process.

I ran across them the other day, and seeing them again just brought back so many warm memories. Heís been gone 13 years now, and Iíll probably keep these pictures for many more years.

Suzanne Park Novoselac
Illinois
April 30, 2001

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Your site concerning Paint-by-Number art is very nicely done!

In my parentsí home, there are two paintings done by an aunt, my Dadís sister (who passed away in 1991). They are paint-by-numbers of a springtime scene, very lovely, very detailed, and very well done. I treasure them immensely. They are approx. 18x24, I think. I feel that it may have been "merely" paint-by-number, but knowing this in no way diminishes from what my Aunt created--I think it adds to their charm. When she gave them to our family years ago, my Dad was very honored and immediately had them framed. If a visitor inquired, when weíd say they were done by my Aunt, and they were paint-by-number, theyíd express surprise, because theyíre so good.

As for me, I could never stay in the lines, or have enough patience to finish one!

Thanks, and have a nice day!

Pam
Norman, OK
April 30, 2001

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When I was a little girl, I decided to do a paint-by-numbers work of "art" for my grandparentsí wedding anniversary. I had no money and begged my mother and father to let me do chores to earn enough for the kit.

Unfortunately I was cursed with horrible, alcoholic/drug addict parents, and after much griping they finally agreed to pay me exactly the amount for the kit for doing numerous chores.

When I walked to the store to purchase the kit, I had only enough for the kit, not the tax (I was too young to know what "tax" was). So I went back home and begged my parents for the tax. They griped and refused for some time, until I started crying in frustration over being so close to getting the present I wanted to give my grandparents; then they finally handed over the few cents required to cover the tax.

I walked back to the store, purchased the kit, and brought it home. Upon reading the instructions, I realized that in order to make the paints fluid enough to use properly (and keep them from drying out) I would also need to purchase linseed oil. So I again went to my parents. This time, even though linseed oil was only 85 cents, as I remember, they absolutely refused to either give me the money or allow me to do more chores--they said there were no more chores, I had done them all.

Giving up on my parents, I dove in and struggled to complete that painting with my thick undiluted paints which were quickly drying out as I worked. After a couple of days, even though I was rushing to finish, I was worried I wouldnít be able to. Finally, my paints completely hardened, yet I still had a small section to complete. I tried to reconstitute the paints with anything I could think of found around the house, with no success. I ended up finishing the rest of the blanks by scraping still-flexible chunks where possible from the tiny cups, and pressing them into place, sometimes adhering them with glue.

My grandparents framed and hung the painting in their den, where it remained until they both had passed away many years later.

By the way--the painting was of an elk in a forest.

I developed a passionate interest in all of the arts. Over time, I was able to occasionally purchase regular art materials for myself, and sit for hours painting my favorite outdoor places. In high school one of my paintings was awarded a special regional prize which they created specifically for my painting, as it didnít fit into any of their categories! (That was an abstract of plants.) I was amused that the man giving me the award (the schoolís art teacher, who also ran the townís art supply store) asked what medium I used to paint it. I told him watercolors. He launched into a long criticism about why I "should" have used acrylics. When he finished, I honestly replied: "I used the only paints I had." He became quiet for some time and I think I taught him more about art that day than he did me.

In my 20's, I became senior apprentice to a traditional Chinese artist; ran several types of home decor businesses; and sold every painting I ever showed to anyone! I prefer Western European abstract oil painting; and I have SEVERAL bottles of linseed oil on hand at all times!

Good luck with your exhibition.

Regards,

[anon]
April 30, 2001

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This is quite funny. I am married to an artist, degree in fine art. I have told him many times that I wanted to do Paint by Numbers because I loved it as a child. He would laugh hysterically, letting me know that under no circumstances would a wife of his do this, especially in his art studio!!

So yesterday I was watching Sunday TV and there was a program on the Smithsonian Institutionís exhibition and I was so enchanted, I called him immediately (Iím visiting my dad in another state), and told him I was going to begin doing paint by numbers, and I have this great idea to decorate my laundry room with the entire collection, also framing the history of paint by numbers that Iíve downloaded. So, I begin my "creative" endeavor. I canít wait to smell the paint! Heíll just have to adjust!

Pam Marsh
April 30, 2001

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Introduction | Every Man A Rembrandt | The New Leisure | The Picture's Place
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