Barbara Clark Smith

Curator

Ph.D. Yale University, 1983, American Studies B.A. and M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 1973, American Civilization

Research Specialties: 

18th-century American social and political history; the American Revolution; household life, women, and gender; public history.

Projects: 

Current Projects:

  • Most recent Book: The Freedoms We Lost: Consent and Resistance in Revolutionary America (New York: The New Press, 2010)
    http://www.thenewpress.org/index.php?option=com_title&task=view_title&metaproductid=1667

    Past Projects:

  • Curator, After the Revolution: Everyday Life in America, 1780–1800 (1985)
  • Curator, Men and Women: A History of Costume, Gender, and Power, (1989), and Try This On, traveling version of the exhibition (1993–1994)
  • Co-curator, Claiming a Public Place: Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Pride, 1969–1994, (1994)
  • Co-curator, The American Family in Photographs, (1997)
  • Co-curator, History in A Vacuum Showcase exhibition, (Oct. 1999–April 2000)
  • Consulting curator, Within These Walls . . . , (2001)
  • Co-Curator, Three North American Beginnings: Jamestown, Quebec, and Santa Fe (2006-2009)
Professional Affiliations: 
  • Organization of American History
  • American Studies Association Council, 1999–2002
  • Task Force on Public Practice, 2002–2004 Chair
  • American Historical Association Program Committee, 2002, 2005
  • Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture Council of the Institute, 1994–97

Publications

“Revolutionary Consent,” The Boston Review, 29 (Feb/Mar 2004), pp. 20–25.
Review of Cary Carson, et al. <em>Becoming Americans: Our Struggle to Be Both</em>, in William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser. Vol. 56, No. 4. (Oct. 1999), pp. 842–847.
"Revolution in Boston," for the National Park Service handbook, Boston and the American Revolution, Boston National Historic Park and Freedom Trail (July 1998), pp. 6–73.
"From Another Site: Comments on 'Digitizing Women's History'," Radical History Review 68 (1997), pp. 121–25.
Museum Review, the Yorktown Victory Center, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 54, No. 2. (Apr. 1997), pp. 440–442.
"Social Visions of the American Revolution, 1765–1775," in The Transforming Hand of Revolution: Reconsidering the Revolution as a Social Movement, ed. Ronald Hoffman and Peter J. Albert (Charlottesville, Va.: University of Virginia Press, 1995), pp. 27–57.
"Food Rioters and the American Revolution," William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd ser., Vol. 51, No. 1. (Jan. 1994), pp. 3–38.
“A Case Study of Applied Feminist Theories,” in Gender Perspectives: Essays on Women in Museums, ed. Jane R. Glazer and Artemis A. Zenetou (Washington, D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994), 137–146.
“The Adequate Revolution,” Roundtable on Gordon Wood, <em>The Radicalism of the American Revolution</em>, William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd Ser., Vol. 51, No. 4. (Oct. 1994), 684–692.
Excerpts from a Conference to Honor William Appleman Williams with Dina Copelman, ed. Radical History Review 50 (1991), pp. 39–70.
Response to Nathan Huggins, "The Deforming Mirror of Truth: Slavery and the Master Narrative of American History," Radical History Review 49 (Winter 1991), pp. 56–59.
"The Authority of History: The Changing Public Face of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania," Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography CXIV (1990), pp. 37–66.
<em>Men and Women—A History of Costume, Gender, and Power</em> Kathy Peiss. (Washington, D. C: NMAH, 1989).
Review of “We the People: Creating a New Nation, 1765-1820,” Chicago Historical Society exhibition, The Journal of American History, Vol. 76, No. 1. (Jun. 1989), pp. 198–202.
Review of <em>The Great River, Art and Society of the Connecticut River Valley,</em> 1635–1820, by Gerald W. R. Ward; William N. Hosley, Jr., The New England Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 4. (Dec. 1986), 588–594.
"Markets, Streets, and Stores: Contested Terrain in Pre-industrial Boston," in Autre Temps, Autre Espace/An Other Time An Other Space, ed. Elise Marienstras and Barbara Karsky (Nancy, France: Presses universitaires de Nancy, 1986), pp. 172–97.
<em>After the Revolution: The Smithsonian History of Everyday Life in the Eighteenth Century </em> (New York: Pantheon Press, 1985).