SLATES, SLIDE RULERS, AND SOFTWARE--TEACHING MATH IN AMERICA
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MACSYMA (Project MACís SYmbolic MAnipulation System) is a set of programs used to solve problems in algebra, calculus, linear algebra, and differential equations. Development began in 1968 as part of planning for a new computer to be built at MIT known as the MAC. In 1982, MIT granted Symbolics, Inc., a license to sell a commercial version of MACSYMA. The program has also been modified and distributed under other names.  
Macsyma reference manual - Click To Enlarge
MACSYMA REFERENCE MANUAL

 


 

The physicist Stephen Wolfram and his colleagues developed this system of programs for technical and scientific computing beginning in 1986. Mathematica, released in 1988, was particularly noteworthy for its graphic capabilities and ease of editing.  

 

  The book shown on the right was the reference manual. David Cox used the programs to create examples and illustrations for undergraduate calculus classes, to prepare a Mathematica package to be used in conjunction with a book, and to investigate questions in algebraic geometry.  
Mathematica - Click To Enlarge
MATHEMATICA

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Computer programs can both compute numbers and manipulate the symbols in equations. Early programs for symbolic manipulation were written in sophisticated computer languages and only ran on large computers.  

 

  Albert Rich and David Stoutemyer wrote a computer algebra program for microcomputers, which they named muMath. In 1979, Stoutemyer and Rich formed a partnership to produce muMath. In 1988 the partnership, now named Soft Warehouse, Inc., introduced a successor to muMath, DERIVE. More recently, staff from Soft Warehouse coauthored programs embodied in the TI-92 graphing calculator.

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User Manual for DERIVE - Click To Enlarge
USER MANUALS FOR DERIVE

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