World War I Social Media Day on April 11, 2017

Mark your calendar, get your questions ready, and prepare to spend the day nerding out about World War I on Tuesday, April 11, 2017. 

What: Museums, archives, and other educational institutions around the world will share a day of social media activity focused on World War I history. Follow these institutions on social media and you'll discover interesting content almost every single day. But on April 11, experts and educators will be online to answer questions, test your knowledge in pop quizzes, and take you behind the scenes with live video. 

Who: Whether you're a social media super user or just getting the hang of it, you'll find engaging history-focused activities on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and other social networks.

Where: Mostly Facebook and Twitter. See the list below for links.

When: All day on Tuesday, April 11. See schedule below. The list below begins with programs on Twitter and then lists programs on Facebook. You can also see a chronological list of the whole day. 

 

Menu of #WorldWar1 social media activities on Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Note: All times are ET 

TWITTER 

Twitter Q&A with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
@nmaahc
10-11 a.m. and throughout the rest of the day
Join us to learn more about the experiences of African American forces fighting in a segregated military! Follow along as we explore our World War I collections, learn about the contribution of African American troops from our military curator, and get a sneak peek of our related objects. Get your questions ready! 

World War I Pop Quiz from the National Museum of American Jewish History
National Museum of American Jewish History
@NMAJH
10-11 a.m.
Did you know that 250,000 Jews served in the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I? Tune into the National Museum of American Jewish History's Twitter account for a pop quiz related to American Jews' involvement in World War I. You can learn more in our current special exhibition, 1917: How One Year Changed the World.
Missed it? See the Twitter summary

National Endowment for the Humanities Twitterstorm
National Endowment for the Humanities
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Through support of films, seminars, exhibitions, and teach training programs, NEH helps Americans understand their history and government from the constitution to the modern era. Join the National Endowment for the Humanities as it shares and highlights projects and programs that have shaped our understanding of World War I. Join the Twitterstorm and tweet along!
Missed it? See the Twitter summary!
 
Q&A: Women and Medicine during World War I
National Museum of American History
@amhistorymuseum
1-2 p.m.
Women donned uniforms and volunteered to help the war effort during World War I, doing everything from operating phone lines to caring for the wounded at home and abroad. These women pushed the boundaries of traditional roles and expectations of women. Join us on Twitter as experts from our Armed Forces History and Medicine and Science teams share their favorite stories and answer your questions.
Missed it? See the Twitter summary
 

Twitter Q&A: World War I and Art with Peter Jakab, Chief Curator
Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum
@airandspace
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Before World War I, war art largely depicted heroic military leaders and romanticized battles, done long after the fact, far from the battlefield. The First World War marked a turning point with the appearance of artwork intended to capture the moment in a realistic way, by first-hand participants. Our newest exhibition, Artist Soldiers, examines this form of artistic expression from two complementary perspectives: one, professional artists who were recruited by the U.S. Army; the other, soldiers who created artwork. 
Missed it? See the Twitter summary!

Q&A: U.S. Presidents who served during World War I
Presidential Libraries
@OurPresidents@HooverPresLib@FDRLibrary@TrumanLibrary@IkeLibrary
2 p.m.
Join archivists from the Presidential Libraries to learn how presidents Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Truman, and Eisenhower served during the war.
Missed it? See the Twitter summary
 
World War I Twitter Q&A with National Park Service
2-3 p.m.
What role did the national parks play in World War I? Join National Park Service rangers as they share little-known stories from the Great War in this 60-minute Twitter Q&A.
Missed it? See the Twitter summary
 

Pop quiz! What do YOU know about the service of American Indians during World War I?
National Museum of the American Indian
@SmithsonianNMAI
3-4 p.m.
Did you know that Native Americans have served the U.S. military in every conflict since the Revolutionary War? There’s so much more to learn. Tune in on Twitter to test your knowledge and learn from the experts at the National Museum of the American Indian.

Spymania in Falmouth: Code-breaking activity
English Heritage
@EnglishHeritage  
7 a.m. - 1 p.m.
At the start of the war, the town of Falmouth in Cornwall, England, became a secure area where people of foreign origin, or "aliens," were excluded. Anyone attempting to enter England from the western end of the English Channel was required to report into Falmouth via the port Examination Service. Anyone under suspicion might be questioned by the Alien Officer, a Home Office employee empowered to arrest citizens of hostile nations. This led to a serious case of "spymania." Join us on Twitter for code-breaking activity with our experts.
Learn more

 

FACEBOOK 

Over There: Dayton in the Great War
Carillon Historical Park
Carillon Historical Park on Facebook
9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Dayton, Ohio, gave the world the airplane, the automobile self-starter, the cash register, and so much more. By 1900, Dayton had more patents, per capita, than any city in the United States, and World War I only served to strengthen Dayton's status as a giant in manufacturing, technology, and innovation. In May 2016, Carillon Historical Park debuted an extensive commemorative World War I exhibition, Over There: Dayton in the Great War. Join us for a series of pop quizzes that will test your knowledge of Dayton's involvement in the Great War. Presented throughout the day, the pop quizzes will be augmented by photos from Carillon Historical Park's World War I exhibition. 

World War I Pop Quiz on Cryptology
National Cryptologic Museum
National Cryptologic Museum on Facebook 
10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Cryptology: the practice and study of codes and ciphers. How much do you know about cryptology during the Great War? Join the National Cryptologic Museum on Facebook for a pop quiz to explore topics, such as high tech cryptology during the war, famous names in code breaking, and more.

World War I in Photos: A Peek inside the Special Media Research Room
National Archives
National Archives on Facebook
10:30 a.m.
Military historian and archivist Mitchell Yockelson showcases his favorite photographs from the war and answers your questions.
Missed it? Watch on Facebook.

Facebook Live chat: Censorship and the Mail during World War I
National Postal Museum
National Postal Museum on Facebook
12-1 p.m.
Join postal history curator Lynn Heidelbaugh as she shares objects and answers your questions related to censorship and the mail during World War 1. 
Missed it? Watch on Facebook.

Facebook Live with Tyler Gum of the Pennsylvania Military Museum: The role of the citizen soldier in World War I and Pennsylvania's legacy
The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission
Pennsylvania Trails of History on Facebook
1-2 p.m. 
Join Site Administrator Tyler Gum as he recounts the citizen soldier's role in World War I and Pennsylvania's legacy during the Great War.  Immediately after the video, Tyler Gum will answer questions via the comment section of the post.
Missed it? Watch on Facebook.

Facebook Live with the National Archives at New York City: Online resources for World War I Military Records
National Archives at New York City
National Archives at New York City on Facebook
2 pm
Tune in to Facebook Live for a recap of our Finding Family Genealogy Series, which will be discussing online resources for veterans and military records related to World War I.

Remembering World War I through Portraiture and Memorials
National Portrait Gallery
National Portrait Gallery on Facebook
3-3:30 p.m.
Hear memorial expert Kate C. Lemay discuss the Portrait Gallery's painting of General John J. Pershing, as well as the history of World War I remembrance. Lemay will be available for questions as well. 
Missed it? Watch on Facebook.

Facebook Live chat: The Extraordinary Story of one Kansan during World War I
Kansas Historical Society
Kansas Historical Society on Facebook
6:30 p.m.
Tune in to Facebook Live to learn about the remarkable Kansan who survived through both World Wars and see objects related to his time overseas. Get your questions ready as we'll answer as many as we can fit in!
Learn more

Debating America's Role in the World | Facebook Live Q&A on The Great War
American Experience | PBS
facebook.com/americanexperiencepbs
8-9 p.m.
We're looking for your reactions, comments, and questions after the broadcast premiere of the first episode of The Great War. Join Gene Tempest, Historian in Residence at American Experience, and Chris Capozzola, Professor of History at MIT, author of Uncle Sam Wants You, and interviewee in The Great War, as they take your questions about the first episode and the early years of the conflict. Didn't catch Monday night's premiere? No problem, all your World War I questions are welcome. Gene and Chris will catch you up on the early debates, historical characters, and unresolved questions from the war that shaped the world we live in. The Great War airs on PBS stations nationwide on April 10, 11, and 12 at 9/8c.

ON THE WEB

Tagging mission: World War I posters
National Archives
National Archives website
All day
Become a citizen archivist and join us to help "tag"World War I posters. By adding keywords of details and features found on the poster in our catalog, you can help make them more accessible to researchers, students, and the public. Educators and classroom teachers, this is a great way to get students involved in doing American history! New to Tagging? Learn how to get started
Learn more

Transcription mission: Fire and Orientation notes by Harry S. Truman
National Archives
National Archives website

All day
Calling all military history buffs! Help us to transcribe Harry S. Truman's handwritten notes that he took during his training to learn to fire the French 75 millimeter guns that his artillery unit used while in France. Learn about the future president's experience during the war.

Transcribe World War I stories with the Smithsonian Transcription Center
Smithsonian Transcription Center
Smithsonian Transcription Center website
All day
Join the Smithsonian Transcription Center and other digital volunteers to transcribe notebooks and letters detailing the experiences of the Great War. Available to transcribe are the notebooks of Friedrich Karl Georg Rumpf (1888-1949), a German illustrator and ethnographer, who lived as a prisoner of war in Japan following the outbreak of war. You'll also learn about the life of African American officers and soldiers at war. Expect challenges with the notebooks fshared by the Freer-Sackler Galleries and handwritten letters from the National Museum of African American History and Culture—and to gain a new perspective on World War I. 

INSTAGRAM AND SNAPCHAT

Instagram Q&A on the World War I Red Cross Production Corps
Red Cross
8 a.m. -  3 pm
Rolling, knitting, and stitching! Starting in 1916, the Women's Bureau of the Red Cross recruited volunteers to support Red Cross societies in war-torn Europe by rolling bandages for hospitalized servicemen as well as knitting and sewing clothing for civilian relief. When the United States entered the war in 1917, the work of the production corps work grew to encompass the active U.S. military headed for the battlefields in Europe. Follow us on Instagram for multiple posts throughout the day and an opportunity to ask us about Red Cross history during the war. Our experts will respond to questions left in the comments so bring your curiosity. 
 

Social Media Takeover with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Instagram: @nmaahc
Snapchat: @nmaahc
All day
Follow us on Instagram and Snapchat as our experts "takeover" those accounts. Tune in to learn about the experiences of African American forces fighting in a segregated military! We'll explore our World War I collections, discover the contribution of African American troops from our military curator, and get a sneak peek at related objects. 
Missed it? See the Twitter summary


Teachers, many of these activities are classroom-compatible. Feel free to contact these educational institutions via social media for tips on how your students can participate. 

Social media managers interested in adding their museum's or archive's programming to this list may contact Erin Blasco by email at blascoe[at]si.edu.

 

From Our Blog

A dark-colored cape laid out on a white surface. It has a red lining. One can see what may be a cloche hat next to it.
(Detail image) Black and white photo of an African American man in military uniform. His arms are gently crossed, a watch o his wrist. His head is slightly tilted to the right, with a serious but gentle look on his face. The uniform has pockets, buttons, and a fairly high collar.
See more blog posts