West Point in the Making of America

History

Graduates

Discover

Resources

Exhibition

William Crozier

William Crozier



Related Items



75-mm shell

75-mm shell



William Crozier (1855–1942)
CLASS OF 1876

Crozier’s career began with three years in the West and eight years teaching mathematics at West Point. Reassigned to the office of the chief of ordnance in 1887, he helped improve coastal artillery with such inventions as the disappearing gun carriage. After field service in the Philippines and China, he returned to West Point.

In 1901 President Teddy Roosevelt plucked Captain Crozier from West Point to become a brigadier general and chief of ordnance, a position he held until 1918. Crozier made federal armories the testing grounds for new weapons and more efficient manufacturing techniques.

Recognizing the growing interdependence of ordnance and civil science, engineering, and industry, he became a forceful advocate of industrial preparedness. His efforts paid off handsomely in World War I. Crozier played a vital role organizing the conversion of civilian factories for ordnance production.



NEXT




Henry Granville Sharpe




Key Figures






William Crozier
William Crozier
1855–1942
Class of 1876



Henry Granville Sharpe
Henry Granville Sharpe
1858–1947
Class of 1880



George Owen Squier
George Owen Squier
1865–1934
Class of 1887





Smithsonian National Museum of American History


E-mail Signup | Sponsors | Credits
West Point in History Introduction 1802–1860 1861–1870 1866–1914 1914–1918 Epilogue Introduction 1802–1860 1861–1870 1866–1914 1914–1918 Epilogue Mobilizing Manpower and Industry Supplying the Army America at War