Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"On Looking in the Mirror of An Institution," Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy Newsletter; reprinted in Northeast Indian Quarterly, Summer, 1990; The Graduate Quill, SUNY/Buffalo, April, 1991.

An article, taken from a keynote address at the opening of an exhibition on Indian education at Hampton Institute, which suggests the lessons learned for the present from an examination of a particular moment in the historical past.

"The Only Good Indian: Images of the American Indian in American Vernacular Culture," PhD Dissertation, Indiana University, 1973.

A dissertation on images and representations of American Indians in American culture, with an emphasis on visual and material representations and on oral tradition taken from collections at the Smithsonian Institution.

"Down Home In the City: A Store-Bought Remembrance." Wine, Food and the Arts, II: Works Gathered By the American Institute of Wine and Food. San Francisco: AIWF and Swan’s Island Books, 1997.

An essay on food and memory.

"The Beaded Adidas," in Charles Camp, ed. Time and Temperature: A Centennial Retrospective. Washington, DC: American Folklore Society, 1989: 66–67; reprinted in The Messenger (Wheelwright Museum Newsletter), 1989; The Runner (Smithsonian American Indian Newsletter); 1990.

A piece which examines a modern American Indian object–a pair of beaded running shoes–and comments on scholarly resistance to changing forms in American Indian expressive culture.

The British Museum Encyclopedia of Native North America, with Melanie Fernandez. London, Bloomington, IN, Toronto, Canada: British Museum Press, 1999.

Up-to-date histories and cultures of first peoples (North America) from a native perspective; highly illustrated, with stories, poems, eye-witness, first person accounts from native peoples on events, issues, art, mythologies, gender roles, economics, contact, sovereignty, self-determination, land, environment. Uses artifacts from the collections at the British Museum and Smithsonian.

"Research in the Nation's Junkpile: Folklore Research in the Smithsonian Institution." Folklore Forum 5, no. 1(January, 1972).

An article, based on dissertation research at the Smithsonian, commenting on the usefulness of collections there to folklorists and researchers in American material culture.

"We Never Saw These Things Before': Southwest Indian Laughter and Resistance to the Invasion of the Tse va ho." In M. Weigle and Barbara Babcock. The Great Southwest of the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe Railway. Phoenix: The Heard Museum, 1996.

An essay on the uses of traditional and contemporary visual art and material culture as a form of resistance among Pueblos.

"A Modest Proposal: The Museum of the Plains White Person," in Senator Robert Torricelli, Andrew Carroll, and Andrew Dubill, eds. In Our Own Words: Greatest Speeches of The American Century. Kodansha America, Inc., 1999.

A satirical reversal of the usual representation of Native Americans in museums.

"The Image of the Indian in American Popular Culture" in Wilcomb Washburn, ed. The Handbook of North American Indians IV. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press: 587–606, 1989.
"An Addendum on American Indian Cultural Policies" to the Report of the American Indian Policy Review Commission. with Arnold T. Anderson et al. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1977.

An analysis of U.S. policies relative to Native American cultures (language, education, art production and preservation, music) for a federally commisioned report.

"Virgins, Booze, and American Elections," New York Times, April 8, 2016.
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War," New York Times, July 9, 2014
The Virgin Vote: How Young Americans Made Democracy Social, Politics Personal, and Voting Popular in the Nineteenth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.
"The Wild Children of Yesteryear" New York Times, May 31, 2014
"Anxious Youth, Then and Now" New York Times, December 31, 2013
"When the Civil War Came to New York," New York Times, July 13, 2013
The Virgin Vote: How Young Americans Made Democracy Social, Politics Personal, and Voting Popular in the Nineteenth Century Forthcoming, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.

The Virgin Vote uncovers the forgotten role young men and women played in American politics from 1840 through 1900. Drawing on hundreds of unpublished diaries and letters – by barmaids and belles, sharecroppers and cowboys – it explores the way children, youths, and young adults used democracy to win maturity. At the same time, parents and politicians trained children to be “violent little partisans” and pushed young men to assert their masculinity by casting their “virgin votes” at age twenty-one, pushing voter turnouts to historic peaks. On a personal level, youths used democracy to win adulthood, while on a structural level politicians used youths to maintain political power.

"Riling Up the 'Shrewd, Wild Boys'" New York Times, August 9, 2012
"D.I.Y. Education Before YouTube," The New York Times, July 11, 2015.
"The Stephen Colbert of the Civil War" New York Times, June 11, 2012
"Was Abolitionism a Failure?" The New York Times, January 30, 2015.
"Laugh During Wartime" New York Times, January 9, 2012
"Don't Throw the Bums Out" The New York Times, September 24, 2014.
"'Young Men for War': The Wide Awakes and Lincoln's 1860 Presidential Campaign" Journal of American History, 96 (Sept. 2009), 357–78.  
"How Coffee Fueled the Civil War" The New York Times, July 9, 2014.

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