Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"Clio in Museum Garb" Science Museum Papers in the History of Technology, no. 4, April 1997: 36-46.

The emergence of an academic ethos at the Smithsonian

“Science Moderne: Sigfried Giedion’s Space, Time and Architecture and Mechanization Takes Command,” Technology and Culture, vol. 43, April 2002, pp.374–389.
Research Budgets in an Age of Limits (co-editor, with Klaus-Dirk Henke and Hans-Liudger Dienel) vol. 2 Europaische Schriften zu Staat und Wirtschaft, ed. Klaus-Dirk Henke (Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 2000).

Collection of articles on effect of declining state budgets on national scientific and research institutions, including the work of museums and other cultural institutions.

“Exhibiting Atomic Culture: The View from Oak Ridge" in  “Vision of the Atomic Age: Towards a Comparative Perspective,” special issues of History and Technology, ed. Morris Low and Robert Kargon, vol. 19, September, 2003, pp. 211-226.

Examination of atom bomb exhibitions at the American Museum of Science and Energy

Inventing for the Environment, co-editor with Joyce Bedi. (Cambridge, Mass..: MIT Press, 2003).

Book of essays resulting from a multidisciplinary conference on the role of invention in mitigating environmental problems.

From Empire to Humanity: The American Revolution and the Origins of Humanitarianism. Oxford University Press, 2016.
“‘Kept Right on Fightin…’: African American Working Women’s Activism in Civil Rights Era Milwaukee.” Journal of Civil and Human Rights, 2:1.
“‘Fighting Their Own Economic Battles’: Saint Charles Lockett, Ethnic Enterprizes and the Challenges of Black Capitalism in 1970s Milwaukee.” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society special issue on Black Women’s Labor: Economics, Culture and Politics, 18:1.
“‘We’ve Been Behind the Scenes’: Fair Employment and Project Equality in 1970s Milwaukee.” In The Strange Careers of Jim Crow North edited by Jeanne Theoharis and Brian Purnell with Komozi Woodard (NYU Press, 2019).
The Promise of a New Life: Jewish Immigrants in America, 1820–1880. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Behring Center, 2003.

Expands on the exhibition of similar name.

"Handcraft to Industry, Philadelphia Ceramics in the First Half of the Ninteenth Century." Smithsonian Studies in History and Technology, No. 43. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1980.
"Marketing American Pottery: Maulden Perine in Baltimore." Winterthur Portfolio 19 (1984).
"The Business of Potting, 1780–1840" in The Craftsman in Early America, edited by Ian M.G. Quimby. (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1984.)
"A History of Clean," pamphlet co-authored with Barbara Clark Smith, National Museum of American History, 1999.

Examines the social history of housework in America through artifacts used to clean the home.

"The Bryn Athyn Cathedral Project: Craft, Community and Faith" in Bert Denker, ed. The Substance of Style:Perspectives on the American Arts and Crafts Movement, Winterthur, 1996.

Explores the relationship between religion and craft in an early twentieth-century community.

Historic Furnishings Report, Building 34/35, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, co-authored with Carol Petravage and Patricia Craig, National Park Service, 1995.

Illuminates the influence of martial law on civilian life during the Civil War in Harpers Ferry.

"The Bryn Athyn Cathedral Project: Craft, Community and Faith" in Bert Denker. Ed. The Substance of Style: Perspectives on the American Arts and Crafts Movement. Hanover: University Press of New England, 1996.

Focuses on the creation of the stained glass windows for the Bryn Athyn Cathedral to explore the relationship between a religious community and the arts and crafts movement in the early twentieth century.

"More is Better: Gender, Class Identity, and Mass Consumption in Postwar America," American Quarterly, Dec. 2002.

Offers a reconsideration of postwar class relations by exploring the influence of working-class women on American social life and culture.

"More is Better: Mass Consumption, Gender, and Class Identity in Postwar America," American Quarterly. December 2002.

Explores the influence of working-class women on suburban life and the design of household goods in post-World War II America.

"Preserving Women: Refrigerator Design as Social Process in the 1930s," Technology and Culture, Oct. 2002.

Analyzes the design and acceptance of new domestic technologies in the 1930s as part of defining a modern American social order.

"Preserving Women: Refrigerator Design as Social Process in the 1930s." Technology and Culture. October 2002.

Examines the marketing strategies designers used to appeal to the middle-class consumer and the ways manufacturers, advertisers, designers, and government agencies constructed ideas about women, family, and society in the 1930s. Includes illustrations of trade literature in the NMAH library collections.

No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai`i during WWII. Philadelphia: Temple U. Press, 2004.
The Columbia Documentary History of the Asian American Experience. e.d. N.Y.: Columbia U. Press, 2002.
"Maps on My Past: Race, Space, and Place in the Life Stories of Washington, D.C. Area Teenagers," Oral History Review 22/2 (Winter 1995) pp. 33–53.

Using mental mapping to frame teen memories of personal past and knowledge of those beyond their communities.

A Woman's Place: The Maine Point of View. (Augusta: Maine State Museum, 1976).

Catalog for exhibition and bibliographical guide on Maine women's history.

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