Publications

The list of selected staff publications may be searched by keyword or author and can be sorted by year.

"The Teodoro Vidal Collection: Creating Space for Latinos at the National Museum of American History," in Public Historian Vol. 23, No. 4, Fall 2001.
"Old South, New Migrations" in Many Voices, One Nation: Material Culture Reflections on Race and Migration in the United States. Margaret Salazar-Porzio and Joan Troyano, eds., Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, 2017, P.231-243. 
“Doing it with “Ganas”: Mexican and Mexican Americans Shaping the California Wine Industry,” Southern California Quarterly, Vol 100, No. 2, Summer 2018, p. 216-243. 
"Documenting and Preserving the History of the Bracero Program" in The Federalist Newsletter, No. 22 (Summer 2009)
“Tortillas, Tacos, and Berries: Reflections on Collecting Latino Food History at the National Museum of American History”  in Food and Museums, Nina Levent and Irina D. Mihalache, eds. Bloomsbury Academic, 2016.
“Creating a Bracero Archive: Collaborations, Collections, and Challenges,” Diálogo, Vol. 19, No. 2, Fall 2016, 7-20. 
“Displaying the Great War in America: The World War I Exhibition of the United States National Museum in Washington DC, 1918 and Beyond.” Smithsonian Books, 2008.
“The Inception of the World War II ‘Ike Jacket.’” Military Collector and Historian 43 (Winter 1991): 146–153.
"Review of Improbable Warriors: Women Scientists and the U.S. Navy in World War II by Kathleen Broome Williams." Technology and Culture 44 (2003): 439–440.
“Military Uniforms,” in Dictionary of American History, ed. Stanley Kutler. 3rd ed. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons Reference Books. 2003.
West Point in the Making of America with Barton C. Hacker. Irvington, N.Y.: Hydra, 2002.

Catalog of the West Point in the Making of America exhibition.

“Shaping Military Women Since World War II.” World Archaeology Congress, Washington, June 2003.

American womens' Cold War uniforms reflected official uncertainty about how the regular army's new women should look.

“The World of Camp and Train: The Changing Role of Women in Early Modern Armies” with Barton C. Hacker. In “Sovereign Arms: Armies and Fleets in the World between Lepanto and the French Revolution, 1571–1789,” Rome, 2002.

On the necessary and vital roles women served in supporting the activities of early modern armies.

“From Camp Follower to Lady in Uniform: Women, Social Class and Military Institutions before 1920.” with Barton C. Hacker. Contemporary European History 10 (2001): 353–73.

The relationship between women and military institutions altered radically from the mid 19th century to World War I, because of the changing place in society of both women and the military.

“Volunteers Inspired by Conscription: Uniformed Women in World War I” with Barton C. Hacker. In Total War, Total Defense, 1789–1900, ed. Per Iko, Lars Ericson, and Gunnar Åselius, pp. 346–352. Stockholm: Svenska militärhistorika kommissionen, 2001.

Civilian women in large numbers volunteered for military-related health and welfare services in World War I, donning military-style uniforms as a symbolic claim to full citizenship.

"'Compassion Gave Us a Special Superpower': Vietnamese Women Leaders, Reeducation Camps, and the Politics of Family Reunification, 1977-1991" Journal of Women's History, vol. 30, no. 3 (Fall 2018): 107-131.

Abstract: This article traces the history of the Families for Vietnamese Political Prisoners Association (FVPPA), a community organized formed and led by Vietnamese women in Virginia. Founded as a self-help group in 1977 to offer support for women whose male relatives were detained in reeducation camps after the Vietnam War, the FVPPA grew into a national organization boasting more than one thousand members. This article tells the story of how Khuc Minh Tho, president of the FVPPA, and her all-female team spearheaded a campaign to free reeducation camp prisoners and reunite their families. The FVPPA propelled the politically sensitive issue of reeducation camp prisoners onto the national stage by mobilizing community members, lobbying public officials and humanitarian organizations, and politicizing family separation. In showing how Vietnamese women crafted social networks and fashioned their own politial identities, this article considers the important role that Vietnamese women have played as community organizers, diplomats, and political leaders.

"'Assets of War': Strategic Displacements, Population Movements, and the Uses of Refugees during the Vietnam War, 1965-1973" Journal of American Ethnic History, vol. 39, no. 3 (Spring 2020): 75-100.

Abstract: Long before the emigration of thousands of people out of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos at the end of the Vietnam War, the United States and the government of the Republic of Vietnam were confronted with a "refugee problem" in South Vietnam, where more than three million civilians were displaced between 1965 and 1969. This article examines how officials of the United States and the South Vietnam government sought to address the ever-growing crisis of internally displaced people. It analyzes three ways in which the United States and the GVN used the processes of displacement and displaced civilians to gain political advantage by transforming uprooted villagers into "assets of war," to manage displaced populations by creating a classification system, and to engineer population movements for nation-building projects. These different approaches reveal the importance of displacement as a wartime strategy and the role that displaced villagers served as crucial resources of war.

Wallops Station and the Creation of an American Space Program. Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration History Office, 1997.

This master's thesis explores the social and administrative history of the Wallops Island, V.A. launch facility during the early years of NASA.

“A Different Kind of Chemistry: a History of Tungsten Halogen Lighting.” IEEE Industry Applications Magazine 7 (November–December 2001).

A look at the invention and development of this energy-efficient light source.

Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy. assoc. ed. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2001.

A wide range of energy technologies are covered in this 3 volume set. Though primarily devoted to the current state of the technologies, a substantial amount of historical background (including many brief biographical sketches) is included.

Great Inventions: The Light Bulb. assoc. ed. Mankato, Minn.: Capstone Press, 2004.

Written for second-grade students, this book introduces both how light bulbs work and their history.

“Fuel Cells: A Challenging History” Substantia. An International Journal of the History of Chemistry 3, no. 2, supp. 1, “History of Energy Technologies and Lessons for the Future,” ed. Seth C. Rasmussen, (26 November 2019): 83-97.

An overview of the history of fuel cells. The article presents the differing types of cells, and explores why after 180 years they remain outside the mainstream of electrical generation technology.

"Electric Lighting Policy in the Federal Government: 1880-2016." PhD diss., University of Maryland Baltimore County, 2018. Proquest (2116571661).

This interdisciplinary dissertation examines federal policies affecting electric lighting since the 1880s. After an initial introductory phase, lighting policies developed during two distinct periods separated by a time of transition. Recently enacted standards mark the start of a new transition in which policy makers should reconsider how they use lighting to achieve goals.

"Inventing in a Crisis: Lighting the United States after the 1973 Oil Embargo" Technology & Culture 62, no. 4 (October 2021): 1119-47.

This article examines changes in lighting system technology in the wake of the 1973 oil embargo, puts them in historical context, and describes their use in subsequent public policy.

Instruments of Science. An Historical Encyclopedia with Robert Bud Deborah Warner, eds., (London and New York, 1998).

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