Reciprocal Water Bath Shaker

Description:

David Freedman (1921-2010), a self-taught engineer, and his brother Sigmund, established the New Brunswick Tool & Die Co., in New Brunswick, N.J., in 1946. The firm was incorporated as New Brunswick Scientific in 1958. In May 1988, it was sold to Millipore Corp. for $15 million.

The turning point came when professors from the microbiology department at Rutgers University asked the firm to repair a "shaking machine" that would constantly move bacterial cultures to keep them from congealing. The Rutgers team was led by Selman Waksman, who had just helped discover antibiotics, and the department was in the throes of groundbreaking research. The improved shaker designed and built by David Freedman would become the flagship of the firm’s product line.

A tag on this example reads "RECIPROCAL WATER BATH SHAKER MODEL 76 NEW BRUNSWICK SCIENTIFIC CO., INC."

Date Purchased For The Cohen Lab: 1970

Location: Currently not on view

Place Made: United States: New Jersey, EdisonAssociated Place: United States: California, Stanford

Subject: Jews

Subject:

See more items in: Medicine and Science: Medicine

Exhibition:

Exhibition Location:

Credit Line: Stanley N. Cohen, MD and Stanford University Medical Center

Data Source: National Museum of American History

Id Number: 1987.0757.43Catalog Number: 1987.0757.43Accession Number: 1987.0757Serial Number: 9635

Object Name: Water Bath

Physical Description: metal (overall material)plastic (overall material)glass (overall material)mercury (overall material)Measurements: average spatial: 56 cm x 40.8 cm x 62.5 cm; 22 1/16 in x 16 1/16 in x 24 19/32 inoverall: 31 in x 29 in x 93 in; 78.74 cm x 73.66 cm x 236.22 cm

Guid: http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a9-b7ab-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa

Record Id: nmah_1131242

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