Rival Crock Pot

Description:

In 1971 the Rival Company introduced the Crock-Pot, an electric cooker containing a removable glass or ceramic crock. By maintaining low temperatures, the Crock-pot cooked food slowly and could be left safely unattended for hours. The appliance quickly gained popularity in the 1970s, as more and more women were working outside the home. Before leaving for work, busy home cooks could start a meal in the crockpot, knowing they would return home to fully cooked food.

Pennsylvania residents Robert and Shirley Hunter received this Rival Crockpot as a Christmas gift from Shirley's mother Martha around 1974. Martha, a high school principal's secretary, found the appliance handy for starting dinner before she left for work in the morning. In the Hunter household Robert actually became the primary cook. His crockpot specialties included stews, sauerkraut with kielbasa, chicken and dumplings, pot roast with vegetables, and the family reunion hot dish, halushki, a traditional Polish dish of cabbage, onion, garlic, and noodles.

Subject: Food CultureEating

Subject:

See more items in: Home and Community Life: Domestic Life, Food, FOOD: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000

Exhibition: Food: Transforming the American Table

Exhibition Location: National Museum of American History

Credit Line: Robert and Shirley Hunter

Data Source: National Museum of American History

Id Number: 2011.0213.01.aCatalog Number: 2011.0213.01.aAccession Number: 2011.0213

Object Name: crock pot

Physical Description: metal (overall material)ceramic (overall material)rubber (overall material)plastic (overall material)Measurements: overall: 8 1/2 in x 10 1/2 in; 21.59 cm x 26.67 cm

Guid: http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-90c1-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa

Record Id: nmah_1416081

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