Ironjaw No. 1

Description:

IronJaw, a barbarian living in a post-apocalyptic world, was created for Atlas/Seaboard Comics by Michael Fleisher. A representative of the "swords and sorcery" fantasy genre, IronJaw is best remembered for violent and misogynistic content notable even by the standards of the era.

In 1974-1975, Seaboard Periodicals began publication of "Atlas Comics." Seaboard founder, Martin Goodman, previously used the name for a line of comic books in the 1950s. That line of comics was renamed "Marvel Comics" in 1961. After leaving Marvel, Goodman created Atlas/Seaboard, hoping to compete with his former company, as well as with the other industry titan, DC Comics.

Atlas/Seaboard produced 23 titles, none that ran for more than four issues. Although attracting talents such as Steve Ditko, Neal Adams, and Wally Wood, the company was not successful, ceasing operations after one year. After a brief attempt to revive the brand in 2011, rights to the company's name and properties became the subject of a trademark suit, ceasing publication.

Date Made: 1975

Maker: Atlas Comics

Location: Currently not on view

Subject: ComicsFantasy

Subject:

See more items in: Culture and the Arts: Entertainment

Exhibition:

Exhibition Location:

Credit Line: Gift of George R. Zug

Data Source: National Museum of American History

Id Number: 2013.3039.002Nonaccession Number: 2013.3039Catalog Number: 2013.3039.002

Object Name: comic book

Physical Description: paper (overall material)Measurements: overall: 6 3/4 in x 10 3/4 in; x 17.145 cm x 27.305 cm

Guid: http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746ad-e0b8-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa

Record Id: nmah_1449641

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