Osceola of Florida

Description:

Hand color print, full length portrait of an Indian (Osceola) standing with his arm outstretched holding a rifle. He is standing beside a stone that identifies Osceola and the artist. Catlin and Osceola became friends after Osceola was imprisoned. Osceola, also known as Billy Powell, Asi-yahola in Creek, Rising Sun, Black Dring, and Tiger of the Everglades, was leader of the Seminole Indians. Born in 1804, his mother was Muscogee or Creek on her maternal side and European ancestry from her father. In 1835 he led resistance of the forced removal in what was called the Second Seminole War. He died in 1838 reportedly from malaria in Fort Moultrie federal prison in South Carolina after being tricked into surrendering under a truce flag. By the end of the 1830's, virtually all Seminoles were forced to leave their ancestral home in Florida for the west. Thousands died on the "Trail of Tears."

Date Made: 1838

Depicted: OsceolaMaker: Catlin, George

Location: Currently not on view

Place Made: United States: New York, New York City

Depicted: IndiansSubject: CostumeChronology: 1830-1839AdornmentPortraitsDepicted: Native AmericansFirearms

Subject:

See more items in: Home and Community Life: Domestic Life, Art, Domestic Furnishings

Exhibition:

Exhibition Location:

Credit Line: Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection

Data Source: National Museum of American History

Id Number: DL.63.0186Catalog Number: 63.0186Accession Number: 242030

Object Name: LithographObject Type: Lithograph

Measurements: image: 26 1/4 in x 19 1/2 in; 66.675 cm x 49.53 cm

Guid: http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a1-3255-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa

Record Id: nmah_326049

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