Hillotype Color Daguerreotype

Hillotype Color Daguerreotype

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Description (Brief)
The Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History holds an extraordinary series of early color photographs: sixty-two color daguerreotype plates made by Rev. Levi L. Hill in the early 1850s in Westkill, Greene County, New York. This is the world's largest collection of Heliochromy, a rare early color photographic process based on silver chloride.
Hill's color process was extremely complex, consisting of coating a daguerreotype plate with multiple layers of a compound of different metals that reacted to the different colors in the spectrum. The achievement of inventing a color photographic process in 1850 was even more remarkable considering that Hill was not trained as a scientist and lived in a very remote area of New York State.
Yet Hill was undisputably an important figure in the early history of American photography, an entrepreneur and an enthusiastic innovator. He wrote the first, and one of the best, manuals on daguerreotypy, "A Treatise on Daguerreotype" in 1850; and in 1856 he wrote the first manual on color photography, "Treatise on Heliochromy", which includes a description of his experiments and an overview of all the means of chemically producing pictures in natural colors with light.
Among pieces of importance by Hill are many daguerreotype photographs of illustrations such as this image of the leaves of a plant.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Photograph
Hillotype
photograph
Date made
ca 1850s-1860s
maker
Hill, Levi
Place Made
United States: New York, West Kill
Physical Description
copper plate (overall material)
photographic emulsion (overall material)
chemicals (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 8 1/2 in x 6 1/2 in; 21.59 cm x 16.51 cm
ID Number
PG.003999.60
accession number
125759
catalog number
3999.60
Credit Line
Dr. John B. Garrison
See more items in
Work and Industry: Photographic History
Photography
Hillotypes
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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