Sam Houston's Hunting Knife

Sam Houston's Hunting Knife

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Description
Physical Description
Steel with wooden handle. The handle has an eight-point star-shaped plate with “Houston” inscribed on it.
Specific History
This hunting knife was owned by Sam Houston. In the mid-19th century, Houston presented the knife to New York lawyer Nicholas Dean.
General History
Sam Houston emerged as a prominent player in the affairs of Texas. Houston was elected commander in chief of the armies of Texas and took control of the Texas forces after the fall of the Alamo. On April 21, 1836, his force defeated Santa Anna and secured Texas independence. Houston was elected the first president of the Republic of Texas. After statehood in 1845, Houston was elected senator from Texas to the Congress of the United States.
Object Name
knife
Other Terms
knife; Edged Weapons; Hunting
associated dates
1800-1850
1850-1870
user
Houston, Sam
recipient
Dean, Nicholas
used
United States: Texas
associated place
United States: New York, New York City
Physical Description
silver (overall material)
wood (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 20.3 cm; x 8 in
blade: 12.3 cm; x 4 13/16 in
ID Number
1990.0546.01.01
catalog number
1990.0546.01.01
accession number
1990.0546
Credit Line
Dorothy B. Libbey
subject
Hunting
Expansion and Reform
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Political and Military History: Armed Forces History, General
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Data Source
National Museum of American History
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Comments

Was the handle replaced prior to presenting as a gift? The wear on the blade and sheath do not seem to match in the photograph.

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