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Basketball

Basketball

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Description
A basketball is defined as “an inflated spherical ball used in the game of basketball.” Most basketballs have an inflatable, inner, rubber bladder, are wrapped in layers of fibers, and then are covered with leather, rubber, or a synthetic composite. The surface of a standard 29.5 inch ball is divided by “ribs” and contains approximately 4,118 pebbles, at a diameter of 2.5 millimeters each. The traditional basketball is orange with black ribs although the balls come in a variety of colors. The Wilson Sporting Goods Company began producing basketballs early in its history, but it wasn’t until the 1970s that the Wilson ball was chosen as the official basketball of the National Basketball Association, cementing its place in sports history. The ball shown here was used by the donor, Thomas Weber, during the early 1970s in Newburyport, Massachusetts.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
ball
basketball
Date made
1974
associated dates
1976
1974-1976
user
Weber, Thomas E.
maker
Wilson Sporting Goods Company
associated place
United States: Virginia
Physical Description
synthetic rubber (overall material)
orange (overall color)
black (overall color)
Measurements
overall: 10 in; x 25.4 cm
ID Number
1980.0682.01
catalog number
1980.0682.01
accession number
1980.0682
Credit Line
Thomas E. Weber
subject
Basketball
recreational
Sports
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Sport and Leisure
Artifact Walls exhibit
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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