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Model of a Hinged Octahedron, by Richard P. Baker, Baker #159 (Bricard Octahedron)

Model of a Hinged Octahedron, by Richard P. Baker, Baker #159 (Bricard Octahedron)

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Description
Richard P. Baker made some models of surfaces that hadn’t been known for long. In 1897, the French engineer Raoul Bricard introduced new forms of octahedron. This is model illustrates what is now called a Bricard octahedron. The six triangular faces are hinged together along six edges. The figure consists of two pyramids constructed on the same quadrilateral base (in this case, the faces of the kite-shaped quadrilateral do not appear to lie in one plane). The pyramids have their vertices on the same side of the quadrilateral. Only three faces of each pyramid are shown – the fourth faces intersect. A typed paper tag on the model reads: No.159 (/) Hinged Octahedron, II.
References:
Richard P. Baker, Mathematical Models, Iowa City, 1931, p. 22. The model is described in the section on links. There is a reference to Bricard’s 1897 paper.
Peter Cromwell, Polyhedra, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997, pp. 239-240, 429.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
geometric model
date made
ca 1906-1935
maker
Baker, Richard P.
place made
United States
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
beige (overall color)
hinged and soldered. (overall production method/technique)
Measurements
average spatial: 5.6 cm x 20.9 cm x 16.8 cm; 2 7/32 in x 8 7/32 in x 6 5/8 in
ID Number
MA.211257.034
accession number
211257
catalog number
211257.034
Credit Line
Gift of Frances E. Baker
subject
Mathematics
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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