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Franz Schmidt & Haensch Saccharimeter

Franz Schmidt & Haensch Saccharimeter

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Description
This is a half-shadow polariscope on a trestle stand that was probably made shortly before World War I. The inscriptions read: "Franz Schmidt & Haensch. Berlin, S." and "No. 6883" and "D.R. Pat. No 82523." The referenced German patent, dated 1905, describes the polarizer which enables the observer to equalize the darkness (rather than the color) of the various parts of the image. A dust-proof housing encloses the quartz wedge compensator (which is moved by the vertical rod with milled head) and the linear scale (which reads from -25 to +100 degrees Ventzke). The (missing) observation tube is 400 mm long. This was used at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute.
Ref: Franz Schmidt & Haensch, “Halbschatten-Polarisationsapparat,” German patent 82523 (1895).
Arthur H. Thomas Co., Laboratory Apparatus (Philadelphia, 1906), p. 320.
Arthur H. Thomas Co., Laboratory Apparatus and Reagents (Philadelphia, 1914), p. 430.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Saccharimeter
maker
Franz Schmidt & Haensch
place made
Germany: Berlin, Berlin
Physical Description
brass (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 31 1/4 in x 9 in x 16 1/8 in; 79.375 cm x 22.86 cm x 40.9575 cm
overall: 16 in x 9 in x 29 3/8 in; 40.64 cm x 22.86 cm x 74.6125 cm
ID Number
PH.330534
catalog number
330534
accession number
293490
Credit Line
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
subject
Optics
Chemistry
Germany
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Physical Sciences
Measuring & Mapping
Saccharimeters
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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