Kelsey Excelsior 5x8 press

Kelsey Excelsior 5x8 press

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Description (Brief)
This self-inking lever press was made by the Kelsey Press Company of Meriden, Connecticut during the mid-twentieth century. It is missing its chase and rollers. The press has a height of 18 inches a width of 12 inches and a length of 23 inches; its chase measures 5 inches by 8 inches.
William A. Kelsey started making inexpensive presses for amateurs in 1872, as a calculated challenge to the three existing amateur presses: the Novelty, the Cottage, and the Lowe. Kelsey’s Excelsior became the longest-lasting press on the market, continuing in production from Meriden until 1990. Its basic mechanical form—a toggle lever—was settled by 1874, though the style of the body changed many times over the next 100 years. Another long-lasting feature of the early press was a chase with closed bottom in the form of a tray, to save the amateur from pied type.
Donated by Curtis H. Barker, 1974.
Citation: Elizabeth Harris, "Printing Presses in the Graphic Arts Collection," 1996.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Press, Printing
date made
mid 20th centruy
Date made
mid-20th Centruy
maker
Kelsey Press Company
place made
United States: Connecticut, Meriden
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 18 in x 12 in x 23 in; 45.72 cm x 30.48 cm x 58.42 cm
ID Number
1980.0023.01
catalog number
1980.0023.01
accession number
1980.0023
See more items in
Work and Industry: Graphic Arts
Communications
Printing Presses in the Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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