Psychological Test, Iowa Placement Examinations, Foreign Language Aptitude

Psychological Test, Iowa Placement Examinations, Foreign Language Aptitude

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Description
After their widespread use during World War One, experts increasingly used psychological tests as a tool to rank and sort people in contexts including (but not limited to) education and employment. The Foreign Language Aptitude was constructed by G.D. Stoddard and was revised by Grace Cochran, J.R. Nielson, and D.B. Stuit. It appears to be a part of the larger Iowa Placement Examinations (New Series, Revised). According to the instructions, the test aimed to “see how quickly and accurately you can think in the field of language.” The test contained three parts including inference, construction, and grammar. The inference questions use the language Esperanto. The test is eight pages long. It was published by the Bureau of Educational Research and Service, State University of Iowa, and was copyrighted in 1941.
For a general discussion of testing at the University of Iowa, see 1990.0034.086.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Psychological Test
date made
1941
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 21 cm x 27.2 cm; 8 9/32 in x 10 23/32 in
ID Number
1983.0168.14
catalog number
1983.0168.14
accession number
1983.0168
Credit Line
Gift of Ruth E. Myer
subject
Mathematics
Psychological Tests
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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