Ace press

Ace press

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Description (Brief)
This children’s tin-plate rotary press for rubber type was made by the Superior Marking Equipment Company of Chicago in the mid-20th century. The press has a height of 6 inches a width of 10.5 inches and a length of 16 inches.
The Superior Marking Equipment Company, or SMECO, has made a series of lightweight children’s presses as by-products to its line of office stamps and markers. The Cub press, described separately, is a smaller edition of the Ace.
Donated by R. Stanley Nelson, 1991.
Citation: Elizabeth Harris, "Printing Presses in the Graphic Arts Collection," 1996.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Press, printing
date made
mid 20th century
ca 1950
maker
Superior Marking Equipment Co.
place made
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Physical Description
rubber (overall material)
sheet steel (overall material)
cardboard (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 8 in x 13 in x 9 in; 20.32 cm x 33.02 cm x 22.86 cm
ID Number
1991.0800.01
catalog number
1991.0800.01
accession number
1991.0800
See more items in
Work and Industry: Graphic Arts
Communications
Printing Presses in the Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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Comments

Your review brings back a sentimental flashback to my age 12+ childhood, when my parents gifted to me a little "Superior Cub" metal printing press by SMECO, model no. 8401. In cleaning out the contents of my parent's home in Connecticut, I am now facing the hard decision about discarding this novel little press, purchased for $3.19 at a local Bradlee's store. But that $3.19 toy gift launched me into a career of writing, printing and self-publishing. It was a $3.19 gift that may have influenced the track of my life more than anything else.
Hi Joel You are not alone and might find collegial companionship as a member of the American Printing History Association, or at least related conversations with participants of the web discussion page at briarpress.org.

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