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Berlin Woolwork Pattern

Berlin Woolwork Pattern

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Description
Der Politiker, a Berlin woolwork pattern. Printed square paper with symbols printed in some squares, forming a rudimentary pattern. Complete pattern executed by water-colorist using the symbols as a guide. Interior scene with table, candle, chair and man in colonial dress reading the newspaper. Flame from the candle has caught the rim of his hat on fire.
According to Miss Lambert’s Handbook of Needlework published in 1846, in 1805 a Mr. Phillipson introduced hand painted patterns on ‘point paper’ (graph paper). However, some people thought his patterns were devoid of taste and in 1810 a Madame Wittich prevailed upon her husband, a printseller of note in Berlin to undertake the publication of a series of these patterns. Miss Lambert claimed to have gotten her information from Mr. Wittich. To produce the patterns a master copy of the design was made on paper, then a copperplate was engraved with faint symbols in each square indicating the color. The plate was printed, and colorists painted each square using a tiny square-tipped brush. In 1820 with the introduction of Berlin wools comes the name Berlin woolwork patterns.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
pattern for embroidery
sold
United States
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 15 5/8 in x 13 in; 39.6875 cm x 33.02 cm
ID Number
1998.0360.220
accession number
1998.0360
catalog number
1998.0360.220
Credit Line
Gift of Hope Hanley Levy
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Textiles
Victorian Needlework
Textiles
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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