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Cresolene

Cresolene

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Description
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: Cresolene is a product of coal tar having a germicidal strength greater than carbolic acid. Not to be taken internally.
1/4 teaspoonfuls of Cresolene to a pint of water makes an effective antiseptic for use about the body as in the washing of minor cuts, bruises, etc.... For general disinfecting purposes about the household use three (3) teaspoonfuls to a pint of water.
By the Rideal-Walker (or Hygienic Laboratory) test Vapo-Cresolene has a germicidal strength twice as great as carbolic acid against B. typhosus.
A soothing, sedative, analgesic, vapor inhalant, as applied to the nasal and bronchial membranes. Indicated in nasal and head colds, acute congestions of the nasal mucous membrane, minor bronchial irritations, chest colds and coughs due to colds. Also indicated in all conditions in which a soothing and sedative inhalation is indicated.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
otc preparation
Object Type
OTC Preparation
date made
ca 1930
maker
Vapo-Cresolene Company
Physical Description
cardboard (overall material)
glass (overall material)
cork (overall material)
Measurements
overall as stored: 4 1/2 in x 2 1/4 in x 3 1/4 in; 11.43 cm x 5.715 cm x 8.255 cm
overall: 4 1/2 in x 1 1/2 in x 1 1/2 in; 11.43 cm x 3.81 cm x 3.81 cm
ID Number
2008.0018.301
catalog number
2008.0018.301
accession number
2008.0018
Credit Line
Gift of Richard W. Pollay
subject
Catarrh, Cough & Cold Drugs
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Balm of America
Antibody Initiative: Whooping Cough
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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