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Miss Starlett costume, worn by Carol Burnett on "The Carol Burnett Show"

Miss Starlett costume, worn by Carol Burnett on "The Carol Burnett Show"

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Description (Brief)
“I saw it in a window and just couldn’t resist it,” Carol Burnett remarked about her outrageous “curtain dress,” worn in a comedy sketch that aired on her CBS TV series. Designer Bob Mackie created the costume for the sketch, which was a wild parody of the 1939 film classic Gone with the Wind. The sketch, by writers Mike Marmer and Stan Burns, was humorously titled “Went with the Wind” and Burnett played a character named Starlett O’Hara, a name that lampoons the film’s heroine, Scarlett O’Hara. The skit recreated, in comic terns, a famous scene from the film in which Scarlett fashions a gown from the parlor draperies. Mackie’s design included a brass curtain rod balanced on the shoulders and a hat fashioned from a valence. The costume was a vital ingredient in the overall effect of Burnett’s comic portrayal.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
dress
costume (dress)
costume (dress), Miss Starlett costume, worn by Carol Burnett on "the Carol Burnett Show"
date made
1976
user
Burnett, Carol
maker
Bob Mackie
place made
United States: California
Measurements
overall: 76 1/2 in x 55 in x 60 in; 194.31 cm x 139.7 cm x 152.4 cm
ID Number
2009.0078.01
catalog number
2009.0078.01
accession number
2009.0078
Credit Line
Gift of Bob Mackie
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Clothing & Accessories
Popular Entertainment
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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