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Mandarin Restaurant Chopstick

Mandarin Restaurant Chopstick

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Description
An original chopstick from The Mandarin, in San Francisco, California, a restaurant owned by Cecilia Chiang. This ivory-colored, plastic chopsticks resembles typical Taiwanese melamine chopsticks, 10 inches long, thicker, with squared and round ends and flat tips. Chiang also personalized her sets of chopsticks with her logo. This pair of chopsticks features red English lettering.
Chopsticks are a set of utensils used by billions of people around the world. Chinese people have been using chopsticks since 1200 B.C. and by A.D. 500 spread through Asia to Japan and Vietnam. Early chopsticks were used as cooking utensils, but people began to use them as eating utensils in A.D. 400 when China’s population boom forced them to develop cost-saving habits, such as chopping food into smaller pieces which required less cooking fuel. Knives became obsolete and even killed the mood at the dinner table. Today, there are many different kinds of chopsticks that vary across cultures.
In Cecilia Chiang’s The Mandarin restaurant, chopsticks were part of the place setting for eating utensils. These chopsticks resemble typical Taiwanese melamine chopsticks, 10 inches long, thicker, with squared and round ends and flat tips. Chiang also personalized her sets of chopsticks with her logo. This contrasts from many Chinese restaurants today that use disposable chopsticks, such as the wooden kind a customer has to break apart.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Chopstick
chopstick
Measurements
overall: 27 cm x 1/2 in x 1/2 in; 10 5/8 in x 1.27 cm x 1.27 cm
ID Number
2011.0115.07b
catalog number
2011.0115.07b
accession number
2011.0115
Credit Line
Cecilia Chiang
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Work and Industry: Asian Pacific American Business
Food
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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