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Boycott Grapes Protest Button

Boycott Grapes Protest Button

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Description
Some of the most effective nationwide consumer boycotts and strikes, often lasting for years, were against big fruit and vegetable growers and bulk wine producers.
The struggle to balance fair wages and workers rights while maintaining cheap labor and sustaining farms has been a major issue in the history of agriculture and Mexican American civil rights. The National Farm Labor Union (later the National Agricultural Workers Union), the AFL-CIO, and the United Farm Workers used boycotts, strikes, and stoppages as a way to receive national attention for workers rights and working conditions. In the United States Southwest, agricultural labor was overwhelmingly Mexican and Mexican American. Issues of legal status, workers rights, and displacement of domestic workers are issues unions with predominantly Mexican participation have been struggling with since the 1920’s.
Object Name
pin
button
date made
ca 1970
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1 1/2 in; 3.81 cm
ID Number
2012.0036.06
accession number
2012.0036
catalog number
2012.0036.06
subject
Food Culture
Labor Unions
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Food
FOOD: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000
Exhibition
Food: Transforming the American Table
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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