Radiometer

Radiometer

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Description
The radiometer was invented by the English chemist, William Crookes, and brought to public attention in 1875. James J. Hicks, a London instrument maker, made radiometers to Crookes’ specifications. Joseph Henry, the physicist who served as founding Secretary of the Smithsonian, saw Hicks’ display at the Centennial Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876, and ordered a full set of radiometers for the Institution. This is one of those instruments. The inscription on the glass reads "Crookes' Radiometer / Patented 12 Sept. 1876 / J. Hicks / Sole Maker / London."
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
radiometer
date made
1876
maker
Hicks, J. J.
place made
United Kingdom: England, London, City of London
Measurements
overall: 8 1/4 in x 3 in; 20.955 cm x 7.62 cm
ID Number
PH.1416
catalog number
1416
accession number
6446
Credit Line
Gift of Mary A. Henry
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Physical Sciences
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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