Colgate University Pinback Button

Colgate University Pinback Button

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Description
This collegiate button is red with a white band in the center and "Colgate" printed in red at the center of the button. Colgate has a long athletic history with a particularly interesting football background. Colgate's football history began in 1890 and claims two National Titles (1916 and 1932). The 1932 team is one of the more notable teams in college football history. The team went undefeated and did not allow an opponent to score all season (outscoring opponents 264-0). The 1932 team also debuted new uniforms that were maroon. Due to the success of the team’s defense and the color of their new uniforms, the team became known as the Red Raiders. The nickname would be adopted by all Colgate athletics, until 2001, when the name was changed to just Raiders due to perceived racial connotations. With victories over Syracuse, Brown and Penn State among others, the team expected an invite to the 1933 Rose Bowl. However, they were snubbed in favor of Pittsburgh who would go on to lose to the University of Southern California 35-0. The fact that team was not invited lead some commentators to refer to Colgate as "undefeated, untied, unscored upon and uninvited."
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
button, collegiate
referenced
Colgate University
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1 1/2 in; 3.81 cm
ID Number
1996.0213.255
accession number
1996.0213
catalog number
1996.0213.255
subject
collegiate
Sports
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Sport and Leisure
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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