Button, Strom Thurmond, 1948

Button, Strom Thurmond, 1948

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Description
Strom Thurmond, governor of South Carolina, was the 1948 presidential nominee of the States’ Rights Democratic Party more commonly known as the Dixiecrats. On July 14, 1948, delegates from several Southern states walked out of the Democratic National Convention in opposition to the party platform’s support for civil rights. Three days later, the States’ Rights Party held their own convention, developed a platform supporting racial segregation, and nominated Thurmond for president and Fielding Wright, governor of Mississippi, for vice president. They carried four states but nationally received only 2.4% of the popular vote finishing third behind President Harry S. Truman and Alben Barkley (Democrat) and Thomas Dewey and Earl Warren (Republican) but ahead of Henry Wallace and Glen Taylor (Progressive). Thurmond later served as Senator from South Carolina for over 46 years retiring just after his 100th birthday.
Object Name
button
date made
1948
used date
1948
referenced
Thurmond, Strom
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
red (overall color)
white (overall color)
blue (overall color)
Measurements
overall: 1 in x 1 in; 2.54 cm x 2.54 cm
ID Number
2013.0211.076
accession number
2013.0211
catalog number
2013.0211.076
subject
Political Campaigns
Presidential Campaign of 1948
See more items in
Political and Military History: Political History, Campaign Collection
American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith
Exhibition
American Democracy
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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