Cordelia Hobbs's Sewing Album 1900-1902

Cordelia Hobbs's Sewing Album 1900-1902

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Description
This sewing album/scrapbook was created by Cordelia Hobbs in 1900-1902, when she was in the sixth grade. Handwritten on a label on the front cover of the book is her name, the date, her grade, her location—Medford, Massachusetts—and the text “John Hobbs’ sister.” The words appear to have been first written in pencil and then copied over in pen, perhaps an attempt by Cordelia to keep the label as neat as possible. The scrapbook contains over a dozen sewing samples attached to the pages with small needles, including a red and white checked square and circular black pieces of fabric. Each sample has a handwritten date of creation on its page. Cordelia created the scrapbook, probably as a school assignment, to practice her sewing techniques, a common practice for girls in the late 19th and early 20th century. Cordelia was born in 1889 in Massachusetts to a German mother. Census records show that she remained unmarried into her 40s, working in various positions at a gold leaf manufacturing company.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
scrapbook
date made
1900-1902
place made
United States: Massachusetts, Medford
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 26.2 cm x 20.1 cm x 1.4 cm; 10 5/16 in x 7 29/32 in x 9/16 in
ID Number
2014.0244.109
accession number
2014.0244
catalog number
2014.0244.109
Credit Line
Gift of Dr. Richard Lodish American School Collection
subject
Education
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Textiles
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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