Spirometer

Spirometer

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Description
S. Weir Mitchell, a prominent Philadelphia physician who was interested in anthropometry, reported in 1859 that he had used a small dry gas meter as a spirometer to measure lung capacity. His instrument was made by Code, Hopper & Co., cost no more than $15, and worked quite well. Joseph Henry, the physicist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian, was friendly with Mitchell, interested in anthropometry, and probably acquired this instrument for the Institution. The "Code, Hopper and Co., Manufacturers, Philadelphia" inscription refers to the principal manufacturer of gas meters in Philadelphia in the late 1850s.
Ref: Edwin T. Freedley, Philadelphia and Its Manufactures (Philadelphia, 1858), p. 323.
“Improved Spirometer,” American Journal of the Medical Sciences (1859): 378-379.
“Proceedings of the Franklin Institute,” Journal of the Franklin Institute 38 (1859): 143.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Gas Meter
Gas Meter
spirometer
maker
Code, Hopper and Company
place made
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Measurements
overall: 14 in x 9 in; 35.56 cm x 22.86 cm
overall: 11 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 29.21 cm x 26.035 cm
ID Number
CH.314949
accession number
212903
catalog number
314949
Credit Line
Transfer from Smithsonian Institution Astrophysical Observatory
subject
Science & Scientific Instruments
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Chemistry
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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