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Button, Adlai Stevenson, 1950s

Button, Adlai Stevenson, 1950s

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Description
Adlai Stevenson worked in three administrations, two federal and one state, before becoming the Democratic nominee for president. During World War II, Stevenson served as Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1945, he joined the staff of the Secretary of State to help organize the United Nations. In the administration of President Harry S. Truman, he was an advisor to the first US delegation of the UN General Assembly and later a US delegate. He left the UN to run for governor of Illinois in 1948. As his gubernatorial term was winding down, Stevenson became the 1952 Democratic nominee for president, eventually losing to his Republican opponent Dwight Eisenhower. Stevenson ran against Eisenhower again in 1956 with the same result. Four years later, Stevenson finished fourth in the balloting at the Democratic National Convention that nominated John F. Kennedy. Stevenson worked in his fourth administration when President Kennedy named him the US Ambassador to the United Nations.
Object Name
button
Measurements
overall: 1 1/2 in; 3.81 cm
ID Number
2015.0200.110
catalog number
2015.0200.110
accession number
2015.0200
subject
Political Campaigns
See more items in
Political and Military History: Political History, Campaign Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith
Exhibition
American Democracy
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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