AUTODIN: A Brief Pictorial History of the Automatic Digital Network

AUTODIN: A Brief Pictorial History of the Automatic Digital Network

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Description
AUTODIN (Automatic Digital Network), the Department of Defense's (DoD) first computerized message switching system, was implemented in stages in the 1960s. The system facilitated their communications needs for over thirty years. AUTODIN provided a worldwide, high-speed, automatic, electronic, data communications system for the U.S. Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Navy, and other government agencies. It handled sensitive and classified messages. In all, fourteen (14) AUTODIN Switching Centers (ASC) were installed around the world. In the mid-late 1990s DoD began converting AUTODIN to the Defense Message Service [DMS] and the Defense Information Systems Network.
This white binder contains a table of contents and approximately 100 pictures documenting the AUTODIN system. The 8 x 10 pictures are divided into sections, indexed, and include pictures of the AUTODIN in different locations around the world. The binder contains a photograph of the deactivation of one of the computers and a sample message.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
documentation
date made
2015-03
Physical Description
plastic (overall material)
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 11 3/4 in x 11 1/4 in x 2 1/4 in; 29.845 cm x 28.575 cm x 5.715 cm
ID Number
2015.3091.01
catalog number
2015.3091.01
nonaccession number
2015.3091
Credit Line
Gift of Data System Analytics Inc.
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Computers
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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