Tao-Zeun Chu's Passport, 1970s

Tao-Zeun Chu's Passport, 1970s

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Description
Tao-Zeun “T.Z.” Chu was born in 1934 in Shanghai, China; however, in a time of political uncertainty, his family decided to move to Mumbai (Bombay), India by 1948. Chu and his two sisters were sent to the Woodstock School, an American Missionary high school in the foothills of the Himalayan mountains where he learned English, developed his love of chemistry, and gained a sense of belonging in an international community. T.Z. continued his education in chemistry by traveling to the United States in order to attend college. As a foreign student of modest means, the University of California, Berkeley welcomed Chu as he found a home within the Berkeley Students Cooperative and the College of Chemistry. After graduation, T.Z. worked with a start-up company manufacturing gas chromatographs. As the business expanded, Chu went to Basel, Switzerland to spearhead the European branch of the company but also met his wife of 52 years, Irmgard Suetterlin, there. Through long 12 hour days and the experiences that he gained through his education and work, Tao-Zeun Chu became the first Asian CEO of a public technology company in America.
Object Name
passport
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 5 in x 3 1/2 in x 1/4 in; 12.7 cm x 8.89 cm x.635 cm
ID Number
2016.0327.01
catalog number
2016.0327.01
accession number
2016.0327
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Ethnic
Many Voices, One Nation
Exhibition
Many Voices, One Nation
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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