Marchant I RX Handheld Electronic Calculator with Stand and Case

Marchant I RX Handheld Electronic Calculator with Stand and Case

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Description
This handheld battery operated electronic calculator, made by Smith-Corona-Marchant (SCM), could perform four functions (add, subtract, multiply, and divide). It dates from the early 1970s and cost about $495, when new.
The bottom section is a cover, which when slid up, reveals the number and function keys and engages the mechanism that opens the display screen and powers on the calculator. The calculator uses MOS LSI (metal oxide semiconductor, large scale integration) chips. Smith-Corona-Marchant contracted with American Micro-Systems, Inc. (AMS) and Texas Instruments (TI) for the chips. ASI provided all the functions using a 2-chip design while TI’s design used 3 chips to perform the same functions. The calculators looked and functioned the same, but internally were different.
This example includes a 2-part device made by inventory management company RGIS. Founded in 1958, they were pioneers in the field and remains in business in 2018. RGIS is an acronym for Retail Grocery Inventory Specialist.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
electronic calculator
date made
ca 1972
Physical Description
metal (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
leather (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 11.5 cm x 37 cm x 33 cm; 4 17/32 in x 14 9/16 in x 13 in
overall, calculator and rgis box: 11.5 cm x 23.5 cm x 28 cm; 4 17/32 in x 9 1/4 in x 11 1/32 in
overall, case: 5 cm x 13.3 cm x 33 cm; 1 31/32 in x 5 1/4 in x 13 in
ID Number
2017.0315.02
accession number
2017.0315
catalog number
2017.0315.02
Credit Line
Ernest Eldon Jorgenson
subject
Computers
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Computers
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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