Assay Balance

Assay Balance

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Description
This is an assay (or button) balance in a wooden frame with glass sides and two drawers in the base. The beam is aluminum, and 6 inches long. The inscription on the ivory scale reads “WM AINSWORTH & SONS DENVER COLO. U.S.A.”
William Ainsworth (1850-1917) was born in England, came to the United States as a small child, and grew up in the Mid-West. He moved to Central City, Colorado, in the mid-1870s, and earned his living repairing watches and other small instruments. He made his first balance in 1879, and moved to Denver in 1880. The firm became William Ainsworth & Sons in 1899, and soon claimed to be “the largest manufacturers of fine balances in the world.” It later became Denver Instrument, and was acquired by Sartorius in 1999.
Ref: Henry Heil, Illustrated Catalogue and Price-List of Chemical Apparatus (St. Louis, 1903), pp. 102-105.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Assay Balance
Object Type
Balances
date made
early twentieth century
maker
William Ainsworth and Sons
place made
United States: Colorado, Territory of, Denver
Measurements
beam: 16 cm; 6 5/16 in
case: 42 cm x 50.5 cm x 25.5 cm; 16 9/16 in x 19 7/8 in x 10 1/16 in
each dish: 2 cm; x 13/16 in
ID Number
CH.328132
accession number
270025
catalog number
328132
Credit Line
Colorado School of Mines Department of Metallurgical Engineering
subject
Weights & Measures
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Chemistry
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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