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Dish

Dish

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Description
Single-reeded circular dish with shallow flat well; no foot ring. Rim face struck at top with the incuse crowned roman letters "S, "V" and "C". Well reverse engraved with a merman or fish-man wielding a sword and leading a Wunderfisch or "Wonderfish", which has the head of a man with a cross for his tongue and wearing a crown of three crosses; the body of a fish carrying a cannon on its back and three muskets crossed by a sword or saber and three skulls and a square marked "AD / IP" inside an large "X" on its side; and the legs of a bird. Faintly visible above the engraving are two partial touchmarks of a crowned Tudor rose inside a pair of C-scrolls; third stamp erased and covered by decoration.
Maker attributed to Francis Bassett I (1690-1758; working 1718-1758) or his nephew Francis Bassett II (1729-1800; working 1754-1800) based on the crowned Tudor rose mark (recorded in Laughlin, Pewter in America, vol. 2, #459). Laughlin notes, however, that the mark illustrated (on plate in his collection) is the only example known to him (this dish would be the second). The plate appears to date from the later 18th century, suggesting Francis Bassett II probably made it.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
dish
Object Type
plate
date made
18th century
1750 - 1800
place made
United States: New York, New York City
Physical Description
pewter (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1 in x 14 7/8 in; 2.54 cm x 37.7825 cm
ID Number
1986.0027.10
catalog number
1986.0027.10
accession number
1986.0027
Credit Line
Bequest of Dr. Joseph H. Kler
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Domestic Furnishings
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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