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LIBERTY.

LIBERTY.

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Description (Brief)
Liberty is one of the allegorical symbols of triumph over tyranny. This patriotic painting is a copy of an Edward Savage engraving, "Liberty in the form of the Goddess of Youth, Giving Support to the Bald Eagle." The later part of this inscription is missing in this version and only "Liberty" appears below the picture in the border. The painting was probably Chinese and made for export. A woman is depicted on the right and an eagle on the left. The woman is dressed in white flowing top with a red scarf and a blue skirt. She has long light brown curly hair, which is down and she wears a garland of flowers around her neck. In her left hand is a goblet. The eagle is decending from a shaft of light (the heavens perhaps, and is taking nourishment from Liberty's goblet. The background has gray, blue, and brown clouds, with an American flag topped by a Liberty cap.
The original artist was the painter-engraver Edward Savage, best known for his painting of the Washingon family at Mt Vernon.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
painting
date made
1800 - 1815
painter
unknown
engraver
Savage, Edward
place painting made
China: Canton, Canton
Physical Description
paint, oil (image material)
gilt (image, frame material)
glass (image material)
pine, white (frame material)
composition ornament (frame material)
Measurements
overall: 27 1/2 in x 19 1/2 in x 2 in; 69.85 cm x 49.53 cm x 5.08 cm
ID Number
DL.388148
catalog number
388148
accession number
182022
Credit Line
Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Greenwood
subject
Flags
Eagles
Liberty
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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