Was She Right?

Was She Right?

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Description
This black and white print with a single-color tint depicts an indoor ballroom scene is titled "Was She Right?" which was probably the title of a play. Depicted is an older woman who points and scowls at a younger woman, whose hand is being kissed by a young man kneeling at her feet, while others look on.
This lithograph was produced by the Metropolitan Printing Company and E. Rothengatter. Emil Rothengatter (1848-1939) was a German-born artist and designer of circus posters who worked in cities including Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1896 he won a contest to design the flag of Cincinnati for a work he called “Zero of Burnet Woods.” However controversy over whether Cincinnati should have a flag delayed the design’s formal adoption until 1940. Emil Rothengatter also wrote a book entitled Art of Poster Making in the United States, published in 1911. He died in New York.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
lithograph
Object Type
Lithograph
Date made
n.d.
maker
Rothengatter
Metropolitan Printing Company
place made
United States: New York, New York City
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements
image: 15 1/2 in x 21 in; 39.37 cm x 53.34 cm
ID Number
DL.60.3017
catalog number
60.3017
accession number
228146
Credit Line
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
subject
Adornment
Architecture, Domestic Buildings
Lighting
Dancing
Theater
Marriage
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Clothing & Accessories
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Advertising
Peters Prints
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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