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Fiesta

Fiesta

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Description
Homer Laughlin China Company, who manufactured the infamous “Fiesta ware” line, began as a partnership between the two Laughlin brothers, Homer and Shakespeare, in 1873. The company sold primarily Rockingham and yellow ware then later expanded their market to make semi-vitreous dinner, hotel, and toilet wares as well as white granite products. After the Great Depression the market for inexpensive dinner wares increased, and the “Fiesta ware” line was available for purchase in 1936. Designed by Frederick Hurten Rhead, an English potter from Staffordshire, “Fiesta ware” became highly popular for their bright colors, streamlined design, and mix-and-match capabilities for the everyday household. The tumblars, such as this one, can only be found in the first six colors of "Fiesta ware" only. They were put into production with the other original shapes, and discontinued in 1946.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Tumbler
tumbler
Date made
ca. 1936-46
user
Boughton, George Henry
maker
Homer Laughlin China Co.
place made
United States: West Virginia, Newell
Physical Description
ceramic (overall material)
yellow (overall color)
Measurements
overall: 8.9 cm x 6.3 cm; 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in
overall: 3 1/2 in x 2 1/2 in; 8.89 cm x 6.35 cm
ID Number
1999.0136.15
accession number
1999.0136
catalog number
1999.0136.15
Credit Line
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Morrison in Memory of Charles and Bessie K. Morrison
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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