trousers

trousers

<< >>
Usage conditions apply
Downloads
Description
The donor, born in 1957 in Jackson, New Jersey bought these jeans on sale for $4.50 in 1970 (almost $30 in 2020 dollars), when she was in the 7th grade. Although initially worn by men and associated with the West and ranching, in the 1930s the Levi Strauss company, creator of modern “jeans,” made and marketed them for women. In the 1960s, young people took to wearing jeans as part of a larger social movement against fashion, conspicuous consumption, and to signify their rebellion against their parents’ generation. Jeans became a wardrobe staple in the 1970s and young men and women continued wearing them as they wore out by patching them themselves. This is originally a form of what today we would call DIY fashion. Later this trend in clothing appears in films and television programs now associated with this era.
The jeans are Wrangler and retain some elements of that brand (although she removed the label itself), but she modified them considerably, patching them variously and colorfully as an expression of personal style, to cover worn places, or both. They are well worn. She lengthened the legs so they would fit as she grew taller, rather than to wear with higher heeled shoes or boots, as she wore these jeans primarily with sandals or with sneakers and socks (also donated to the museum) as well as a white t-shirt (also donated), and a poncho.
Object Name
Trousers
Object Type
trousers
Other Terms
Trousers; Lower Body; Main Dress; Girl
Date made
1970
Measurements
overall: flat: 43 in x 30 in; 109.22 cm x 76.2 cm
part: inseam: 30 1/4 in; 76.835 cm
part: waist: 25 in; 63.5 cm
overall, mounted: 42 in x 11 in x 9 1/2 in; 106.68 cm x 27.94 cm x 24.13 cm
ID Number
CS.306097.001
catalog number
306097.001
accession number
306097
Credit Line
Anonymous
subject
Fashion
Women's History
Counterculture--United States--History--20th century
Adolescence
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Costume
Clothing & Accessories
Data Source
National Museum of American History
Nominate this object for photography.   

Our collection database is a work in progress. We may update this record based on further research and review. Learn more about our approach to sharing our collection online.

If you would like to know how you can use content on this page, see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use. If you need to request an image for publication or other use, please visit Rights and Reproductions.

Note: Comment submission is temporarily unavailable while we make improvements to the site. We apologize for the interruption. If you have a question relating to the museum's collections, please first check our Collections FAQ. If you require a personal response, please use our Contact page.