Woman Suffrage Postcard

Woman Suffrage Postcard

Description
Women countered the argument that they were too pure for the dirty business of politics by invoking the Progressive Era’s belief in “social housekeeping.” The logical extension of women’s ability to clean and order their homes was to apply those skills to clean and remedy the ills of society. Some postcards used images of children to project a nonthreatening image of women voters.
The postcard was part of a 1911 campaign for suffrage in California, which by a state-wide referendum in that year became the sixth state to approve woman’s suffrage.
The National American Woman Suffrage Association began a postcard campaign in 1910, partly to raise awareness of the cause and partly as a fundraiser. The cards could be funny, serious, or sentimental. Some employed powerful patriotic symbols and logical arguments to make their case for woman’s right to vote.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
postcard
date made
1915
associated date
1915
associated institution
National Woman Suffrage Publishing Company Incorporated
place made
United States: New Jersey, Elizabeth
Physical Description
paper (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 5 1/2 in x 3 1/2 in x 1/4 in; 13.97 cm x 8.89 cm x .635 cm
ID Number
1979.0939.59
accession number
1979.0939
catalog number
1979.0939.59
Credit Line
Edna L. Stantial
subject
Women's Suffrage
Postcards
Politics
See more items in
Political and Military History: Political History, Campaign Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
Woman Suffrage
Data Source
National Museum of American History

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