Bracelet, Dwight Eisenhower, 1950s

Bracelet, Dwight Eisenhower, 1950s

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Description
This bracelet promoted Dwight Eisenhower, the Republican nominee for president in 1952 and 1956. Using a record as the decorative bangle may reflect the popularity of songs which promoted the candidate and his signature campaign slogan “I Like Ike.” Broadway composer Irving Berlin included a number “They Like Ike” in his Broadway musical Call Me Madam, a song newspaper columnist Inez Robb said “may alone and unaided sweep the general into the White House by acclamation.” Berlin later reworked the song and released recordings of “I Like Ike.”
Many supporters claimed credit for adapting the phrase to “I Like Ike” and, once Eisenhower’s candidacy for the Republican nomination began in earnest, the slogan quickly appeared on a wide variety of campaign items including inexpensive costume jewelry marketed to women. The majority of voters did like him—Eisenhower defeated his Democratic opponent Adlai Stevenson twice, in 1952 and 1956.
Object Name
Bracelet
associated person
Eisenhower, Dwight D.
Physical Description
blue (overall color)
metal, yellow (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 1 3/4 in x 5 1/2 in; 4.445 cm x 13.97 cm
ID Number
PL.280084.37
catalog number
280084.37
accession number
280084
subject
Political Campaigns
See more items in
Political and Military History: Political History, Campaign Collection
Government, Politics, and Reform
American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith
Exhibition
American Democracy
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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