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Plymouth Rock fragment with painted inscription, 1830

Plymouth Rock fragment with painted inscription, 1830

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Description
In the early 1800s, tourists visiting Plymouth Rock were provided a hammer so that they could take a piece of the rock as a souvenir. By 1880, what was left of the rock was fenced off within a memorial.
Gift of the heirs of Mrs. Virginia L. W. Fox, 1911
Object Name
rock fragment
date made
1830
associated place
United States: Massachusetts, Plymouth
Physical Description
stone (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 4 1/4 in x 2 1/2 in x 1 in; 10.795 cm x 6.35 cm x 2.54 cm
ID Number
PL.012058
catalog number
012058
accession number
52309
Credit Line
Virginia L. W. Fox
See more items in
Political and Military History: Political History, General History Collection
Souvenir Nation
Government, Politics, and Reform
Exhibition
Souvenir Nation
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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Comments

In 11/2019 a wonderful 12 song album was released based on the storybook by Diane L. Finn called “The Secrets of Plymouth Rock featuring 28 Plymouth MA 4th and 5th graders singing. You can hear it at PlymouthRock.org. It’s the rock telling the story of the Landing of the Pilgrims up through 1921. Diane L. Finn taught elementary school in Plymouth MA for over 30 years. The storybook and the music together are sold at the Mayflower Society House, Plymouth, MA.
"It's a wonder to see such a relic exists! Thanks for keeping such artifacts for those of us to see hundreds of years later. It really adds to one's education to see such things in real tangible terms versus just reading about them in history books. Now with the internet access, I canshow others what is real along with their heritages, etc."
just love this!

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