Newcomb Pottery vase

Newcomb Pottery vase

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Description (Brief)
Elongated cylindrical vessel with narrow waist and flaring base and mouth. Buff colored body with gauze-like light blue glaze. Top of vessel has decorative band of stylized and repeating green leaves and either a yellow flower bud or fruit. Possibly known as "Wild Tomato" pattern. The decorative band is in low relief or thick slip. Lightly incised decorative line decoration in black, blue and yellow. Possibly decorated by Mazie T. Ryan
Description
Before becoming an international phenomenon, the Arts and Crafts movement began with the ideas of British artisan William Morris (1834-1896) and writer John Ruskin (1819-1900). Morris and Ruskin believed that the growth of cities isolated urban workers and that mass production negatively affected artisan crafts. They proposed to solve these issues by returning to a medieval-inspired village model where everybody participated in a community lifestyle. In the United States, artisans adapted these ideas into the studio art pottery movement. Unlike their British counterparts, who often focused predominantly on social issues and therefore made objects that incorporated Gothic and Renaissance motifs, American craftsmen developed a cohesive and novel aesthetic.
The Newcomb Pottery was founded in 1895 at H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College in New Orleans, Louisiana, the coordinate women’s college of Tulane University. As such, Newcomb Pottery’s main focus was in the practical education of young, primarily middle-class women. Among other courses, the school offered comprehensive classes in design, ceramics, and textiles. Female ceramics decorators were encouraged to design their own vessels, although still within a board-approved aesthetic. The pottery’s wares are best known for their foggy, variegated glazes in colors like green, blue, and periwinkle, and its relief carvings of local plants – water lilies, jonquils, and Spanish moss-covered trees.
This moss-green vase with stylized fruit bears the mark of Mazie T. Ryan, a female decorator working from about 1897-1910. It is important to note that although the Newcomb Pottery was instrumental in giving women like Ms. Ryan early working opportunities and a trade education, college organizers still felt that throwing vessels was not an appropriate occupation for women. Like nearly every other vessel made at Newcomb, this vase was thrown by Joseph Fortune Meyer, who was involved with the earliest developments of the Newcomb Pottery from 1893.
The Newcomb Pottery was founded in 1895 at H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College in New Orleans, Louisiana, the coordinate women’s college of Tulane University. As such, Newcomb Pottery’s main focus was in the practical education of young, primarily middle-class women. Among other courses, the school offered comprehensive classes in design, ceramics, and textiles. Female ceramics decorators were encouraged to design their own vessels, although still within a board-approved aesthetic. The pottery’s wares are best known for their foggy, variegated glazes in colors like green, blue, and periwinkle, and its relief carvings of local plants – water lilies, jonquils, and Spanish moss-covered trees.
This moss-green vase with stylized fruit bears the mark of Mazie T. Ryan, a female decorator working from about 1897-1910. It is important to note that although the Newcomb Pottery was instrumental in giving women like Ms. Ryan early working opportunities and a trade education, college organizers still felt that throwing vessels was not an appropriate occupation for women. Like nearly every other vessel made at Newcomb, this vase was thrown by Joseph Fortune Meyer, who was involved with the earliest developments of the Newcomb Pottery from 1893.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
Vase
date made
c. 1900
c. 1905
maker
Newcomb Pottery
place made
United States: Louisiana, New Orleans
Physical Description
blue (overall color)
polychrome (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 11 3/4 in x 4 1/2 in; 29.845 cm x 11.43 cm
ID Number
CE.237987
catalog number
237987
accession number
45745
Credit Line
Tulane University of Louisiana
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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