The museum is open Fridays through Tuesdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free timed-entry passes are required. Review our latest visitor safety guidelines.

Fender Rhodes Electric Piano

Fender Rhodes Electric Piano

<< >>
Usage conditions apply
Downloads
Description (Brief)

This electric piano was made by the Fender Rhodes Company in Fullerton, California around 1971-1973. It is a Mark I stage piano, which was produced from 1969-1975. This piano is serial number 24761, and has a compass of 6ix octaves, Rhodes action, with hammers facing the keyboard, metal bars with resonator bars and coils to turn vibrations into electrical charges, rubber pads on plastic shank hammers, 2 hand stops: tone regulator and volume regulator, wood frame, an imitation leather-covered wood case, and a folding metal base.

This piano features the following patents:

U. S. Patent #2972922, dated February 28, 1961 by Harold B. Rhodes for an electrical musical instrument in the nature of a piano.

U. S. Patent #3270608, dated September 6, 1966 by Harold B. Rhodes for a piano action.

U. S. Design Patent #200439, dated February 23, 1965 by Harold B. Rhodes for an electric piano.

U.S. Design Patent #200440, dated February 23, 1965 by Harold B. Rhodes for an electric piano.

Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
piano
date made
1971-1973
maker
Fender Rhodes Company
Place Made
United States: California, Fullerton
Physical Description
plastic (overall material)
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 24 in x 48 in x 12 in; 60.96 cm x 121.92 cm x 30.48 cm
ID Number
1988.0047.01
accession number
1988.0047
catalog number
1988.0047.01
Credit Line
Gift of John E. Hasse
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Musical Instruments
Music & Musical Instruments
Pianos
Data Source
National Museum of American History
Nominate this object for photography.   

Our collection database is a work in progress. We may update this record based on further research and review. Learn more about our approach to sharing our collection online.

If you would like to know how you can use content on this page, see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use. If you need to request an image for publication or other use, please visit Rights and Reproductions.

Comments

You can identify exactly what week it was built by looking at the large 4 digit number stamped in red, blue or black ink in the upper right corner behind the pickups WWYY, so 1379 would be the 13th week of 1979 and so on.

Add a comment about this object