Unknown inventorpatentee 1860-1915 of School Desk and Seat Model

Unknown inventor/patentee 1860-1915 of School Desk and Seat Model

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Description
School desk model but this desk does not have a patent number or patent tags so it may be a salesman's sample. The three desks are lined up front to back giving an indication as to what a free standing front desk and a free standing back seat will look like and why it is necessary to order one of each of these per classroom row. Two have chairs attached to the front and the last has a separate chair. There is an enclosed shelf under each desktop. The legs of desks and chair and supports for chairback are metal and all are screwed to a mahogany wood base. The middle desk and chair is missing one screw on one support on the same side.
Object Name
desk, school
model
desk model
Object Type
Patent Model
date made
n.d.
1860-1915
bequest
Hoffman, John
maker
unknown
place made
World
Physical Description
paint (overall material)
non ferrous metal (bronze) (overall material)
wood (overall material)
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 3 1/4 in x 9 3/8 in x 2 in; 8.255 cm x 23.8125 cm x 5.08 cm
ID Number
1983.0508.06
accession number
1983.0508
catalog number
1983.0508.06
Credit Line
Bequest of John R. Hoffman
subject
Education
Patent Models
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Education
Cultures & Communities
American History Education Collection
Patent Model School Seats and Desks
Exhibition
Girlhood
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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