Edward J. Stearns's 1868 School Desk and Seat Patent Model

Edward J. Stearns's 1868 School Desk and Seat Patent Model

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Description
Edward J. Stearns from Cambridge, Maryland, received a U.S. patent for an improved school desk model. Patent no. 76839 was issued on April 14, 1868.
This desk was created to eliminate lid slamming. The design features a lid that opens towards the student and is adequately supported when in use. The desk is supported on a pair of simple turned legs attached to a wooden platform. The platform has a hole for another leg that may have supported a seat. There is writing in black ink across the platform that reads: "E.J. Stearns' School Desk." The stool is round with no backrest. It has a single monobloc base while the desk has two.
We are not aware of any additional information about the inventor/patentee.
Object Name
model
desk model
Object Type
Patent Model
date made
1868
patent date
1868-04-14
patentee
Stearns, Edward I.
transfer
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
inventor
Stearns, Edward I.
referenced in patent specifications
United States: Maryland, Cambridge
Physical Description
non ferrous metal (overall material)
wood (overall material)
metal (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 5 3/4 in x 5 in x 4 in; 14.605 cm x 12.7 cm x 10.16 cm
ID Number
CL.65.0367
accession number
249602
catalog number
65.0367
patent number
76,839
subject
Patent Models
See more items in
Cultural and Community Life: Education
Cultures & Communities
American History Education Collection
Patent Model School Seats and Desks
Exhibition
Girlhood
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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