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Py-Co-Pay Tooth Powder, 3 Oz

Py-Co-Pay Tooth Powder, 3 Oz

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Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
oral hygiene product
tooth powder
collection
Reid Drugstore
maker
Pycope, Inc.
place made
United States: New Jersey, Jersey City
Measurements
overall: 4 3/8 in x 2 1/8 in x 2 1/8 in; 11.1125 cm x 5.3975 cm x 5.3975 cm
ID Number
1984.0351.249
accession number
1984.0351
catalog number
1984.0351.249
Credit Line
Gift of Blanche E. Reid
subject
Dental Products
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Health & Medicine
Beauty and Health
Beauty and Hygiene Products: Oral Care
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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Comments

My dad used to use this product back in the sixties and seventies. His dentist told him to start using it because he was losing so many teeth and his gums were always getting infected. My dad swore by this tooth powder and I used it on occasion in the sixties and seventies. He always bought it at Thrifty drug store I later on went to work there. I believe it contains baking soda which is what I use now for brushing my teeth, and only baking soda.. my teeth stay brighter and whiter and my gums are healthier. I would love to try this again instead of using the bothersome box of baking soda.. thank you so much 4 showing this to me again, I hope I can find it at this one store you printed out...
Hello, my grandfather was Takeo Lens Teragawa. He was a dental professor at USC before WWII. My mom told me he invented Py-Co-Pat tooth powder. The would have been in the 1930-40s. Unfortunately I have no other proof.

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