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1949 GMC Pickup Truck

1949 GMC Pickup Truck

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Description
Ira Wertman, a farmer in Andreas, Pennsylvania, raised fruits and vegetables and peddled them with this truck to retired coal miners near Allentown. He also used the truck to take produce to market and haul supplies from town to the farm. Pickup trucks have been versatile aids to a wide range of agricultural, personal, and business activities. Early pickup trucks were modified automobiles, but postwar models were larger, more powerful, and able to carry heavier loads. Some postwar pickups were used in building suburban communities. Others were used for recreational purposes such as camping, hunting, and fishing. By the 1990s, many people purchased pickups for everyday driving.
Object Name
pickup truck
date made
1949
maker
General Motors Corporation
place made
United States: Pennsylvania
Physical Description
steel (body material)
rubber (tires material)
glass (windows material)
Measurements
overall: 78 in x 74 in x 210 in; 198.12 cm x 187.96 cm x 533.4 cm
ID Number
1999.0057.01
accession number
1999.0057
catalog number
1999.0057.01
Credit Line
Gift of Donald and Christine Wertman
See more items in
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Work
America on the Move
Agriculture
Food
Transportation
Family & Social Life
Road Transportation
Exhibition
America On The Move
Exhibition Location
National Museum of American History
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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