Data General-One Portable Computer

Data General-One Portable Computer

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Description
Data General was primarily a mini-computer company. But in 1984, it introduced the Data General-One (DG-1), a breakthrough personal computer laptop. The Data General One weighed nine pounds, ran MS-DOS, had dual 3 ½" diskettes, 79-key full stroke keyboard, 128 KB to 512 KB of RAM, and a monochrome LCD screen. It ran on a CMOS 80C88 processor. Unlike other "luggable" computers of the era, the DG-1 was light enough to carry on travel, but also powerful enough to emulate a desktop.
The DG-1 enjoyed only mediocre success. Its 3 ½" diskettes were slightly ahead of their time, and much popular software was not available in 3 ½" format. Adding to the problem, software copyright protection made copying into the 3 ½" format difficult. In addition, the DG-1 base price was relatively high at $2,895, and the real cost tended to be even higher, because users generally needed both more RAM and an external 5 ¼" drive to run disks from their desktop machines.
Location
Currently not on view
Object Name
microcomputer
Date made
1984
maker
Data General Corporation
Physical Description
plastic (overall material)
glass (overall material)
metal (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
Measurements
overall: 7.5 cm x 30 cm x 34.5 cm; 2 15/16 in x 11 13/16 in x 13 9/16 in
ID Number
1995.0069.01
accession number
1995.0069
catalog number
1995.0069.01
Credit Line
June E. Mallory
See more items in
Medicine and Science: Computers
Work
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source
National Museum of American History
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